Fewer colonoscopies during pandemic has led to cancer increase, Utah doctors say


A polyp is found throughout a colonoscopy at St. Marks Hospital on this March 22, 2011 photograph. Medical doctors from Intermountain Healthcare on Wednesday inspired individuals to schedule a colonoscopy, notably for the reason that pandemic has led to an enormous drop in screenings. (Laura Seitz, Deseret Information)

Estimated learn time: 4-5 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY — Colonoscopies have a foul fame, partially due to the preparation sufferers have to do earlier than the process. However two Utah docs emphasised Wednesday how they play an essential function in stopping later-stage most cancers and may save lives.

Dr. Nathan Merriman, an Intermountain Healthcare gastroenterologist, stated he has seen lots of hesitance from sufferers needing colonoscopy screenings, particularly over the past two years. He has seen a 50% drop in screening colonoscopies throughout the COVID-19 pandemic.

March is Colorectal Most cancers Consciousness Month, and Merriman is encouraging individuals to take time now to schedule screenings or diagnostic colonoscopies and discuss to relations concerning the challenge.

In the USA, colorectal most cancers is the second-leading reason behind loss of life from most cancers, and the third-leading trigger for each women and men individually. It is anticipated to trigger over 50,000 deaths within the nation this yr.

Because the onset of COVID-19, there was a 15% improve in stage 3 colon most cancers, which is superior sufficient that it’s going to virtually at all times be handled with chemotherapy, in accordance with Dr. Mark Lewis, an oncologist. One of many causes for this might be delayed colonoscopies because of the pandemic.

Lewis stated colon most cancers is essentially preventable, and with early intervention individuals won’t ever have to go see an oncologist like him.

“I by no means wish to give chemo. I imply, no oncologist, frankly, needs to provide chemo. We’re really actively attempting to provide much less of it,” he stated.

Lewis stated that it has by no means been extra essential to catch most cancers earlier and decrease danger for chemotherapy than throughout the pandemic as a result of chemotherapy can weaken the immune system and make it extra doubtless for somebody to contract COVID-19 together with different diseases.

Screenings for colon most cancers have fallen behind different most cancers screenings, he stated, though they’re very efficient. A colonoscopy would not simply discover polyps, small tissue bumps that may change into cancerous, however they may also be eliminated throughout the process.

Merriman stated it is very important discuss with relations about patterns of sickness and illness within the household, specifying if there’s a historical past of most cancers or polyps. Smoking can be a danger issue for colon most cancers.

“We will achieve this rather more to assist one another, particularly on the household stage, to grasp what we’re in danger for,” he stated.

It’s at the moment really helpful that anybody who’s 45 get screened for colorectal most cancers, which was lowered from age 50 in the previous few years. These with a household historical past of colon most cancers ought to start screenings 10 years earlier than the age that their relative was identified. Individuals who have bowel ailments or polyps, or a household historical past of both, also needs to be screened earlier than the age of 45, Merriman stated.

He inspired individuals to ask a health care provider if they’re questioning if they need to get a colonoscopy. He stated the preparation course of for a colonoscopy is “tolerable, not horrible,” and has change into quite a bit higher over the past 10 years, and is constant to enhance.

Indicators that somebody has colon most cancers can embody adjustments within the form of stool, stomach ache that might trigger weight reduction and bloody stools.

Lewis and Merriman each stated they’ve seen a number of sufferers who’ve encountered rectal bleeding for a number of months however waited to speak to a health care provider. They stated if that is persistent, a patent ought to get a colonoscopy and be checked for colon most cancers.

“We cannot know if there are signs happening until (sufferers) really feel snug talking up, and we empower them to talk up … then we will study from our sufferers and assist them to get the care they want,” Merriman stated.

He stated he selected to enter gastroenterology due to an unrelated loss in his life that was preventable, and he hopes to assist forestall tragedies for others.

“We’ve got this wonderful capability to assist forestall struggling by figuring out polyps within the colon, eradicating them and stopping the entire cascade of most cancers that’s arduous, so arduous, on sufferers and their households,” Merriman stated.

Lewis stated that he got here to Utah as a result of it’s the youngest state and there’s a explicit downside with early-onset colorectal most cancers within the state.

Folks must be extra snug speaking about colonoscopies and most cancers, he stated, including that he sees lots of people with guilt or who put stress on themselves after a prognosis. Though there are prevention steps, like colonoscopies, colon most cancers shouldn’t be at all times preventable. Lewis stated some polyps can take 10 years to change into cancerous, whereas others change into cancerous in a short time.

Though they suggest screening at age 45, Lewis stated that relying on how the screening goes some sufferers might not want one other screening for years, whereas others might require follow-ups a lot sooner.

“Every affected person’s remedy is then tailor-made to them so it’s not one dimension matches all. When you get into the screening course of it seems a bit of bit completely different for everyone,” Lewis stated.

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Utah women pull away in 4th quarter to beat Cal, advance to quarterfinals


Utah’s Dru Gylten (10) passes round California’s Leilani McIntosh (1) in the course of the first half of an NCAA faculty basketball sport within the first spherical of the Pac-12 girls’s match Wednesday, March 2, 2022, in Las Vegas. (John Locher, Related Press)

Estimated learn time: 3-4 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY — At a timeout break in the course of the first spherical of the Pac-12 girls’s basketball match on the Michelob ULTRA Enviornment in Las Vegas, Utah head coach Lynne Roberts informed her staff they’d misplaced the third quarter and wanted to play extra bodily after California took a 1-point lead going into the ultimate quarter.

Her staff bought the message — and none apart from freshman Jenna Johnson down the stretch.

Johnson battled within the submit and had a private 6-0 run to present the Utes a 62-56 lead with 1:45 left to play in regulation. However California did not make it straightforward in a battle to advance to the second spherical and doubtlessly upset the No. 6-seeded staff within the match.

California reduce Utah’s result in two with just below a minute to play after dialing up the stress because the Utes introduced the ball up the courtroom.

Johnson introduced the physicality, however Pac-12 Freshman of the 12 months, as voted on by the convention coaches, Gianna Kneepkens settled the rating.

With Utah trying to wear down the clock within the last minute, a Bears double staff freed up Kneepkens within the nook for an open 3-point look. With a Cal defender transferring on the fly-by block try, Kneepkens did a facet step and drove to the basket with a crossover to free her approach to the rim for a simple left-handed layup and a 4-point lead.

All California may do was foul in hopes of slicing into the deficit.

Utah persevered — even with a pair of late misses from the charity stripe on an evening the place the staff shot solely 53% from the free-throw line — and earned a 66-60 victory to advance to the second spherical in opposition to the No. 3-seeded Washington State.

Kneepkens, who led the staff in scoring within the common season, completed with a team-high 20 factors and 5 rebounds, with 16 of her factors coming within the second half for Utah (18-10, 9-7 Pac-12). Johnson completed with 18 factors, three rebounds and three assists in a balanced scoring assault from begin to end from the freshman.

Johnson had a team-high 11 factors on the halftime break and was a key catalyst to the Utes staying forward of the Bears for a lot of the opening half. Utah added to a 6-point halftime lead that was capped off with a Kneepkens 3-pointer to present the Utes its first double-digit lead of the night time with 7:45 left within the third quarter.

California (11-13, 2-11 Pac-12) answered and went on a fast 4-0 run, after which beat Utah within the high-low sport with a number of entry passes to the submit for simple layups to make it a single-possession sport.

And to not be outdone by her freshmen counterparts, California’s Jayda Curry, who was named the Pac-12 Freshman of the 12 months by the media, hit a floater with seven seconds left within the quarter to present the Bears a 1-point lead and the momentum going into the ultimate body.

Curry scrapped and scored as she tried to will her staff to an upset victory, however her effort was not sufficient ultimately — even because the Bears managed just one turnover and held Utah to at least one rebound within the third quarter. Curry, who lead the convention in scoring this season, completed with a team-high 16 factors, seven rebounds and three assists within the loss.

She was joined in double figures by Ugonne Onyiah’s 14 factors and eight rebounds and Evelien Lutje Schipholt’s 11 factors and 4 rebounds. Onyiah, who had 8 of her 14 factors within the second half, was compelled to go away the sport after an obvious knee damage with 3:44 left to play.

Utah will return to motion Thursday (9:30 p.m. MST, Pac-12 Networks) in opposition to Washington State within the quarterfinal spherical of the Pac-12 match. Utah received its solely assembly in opposition to Washington State this season, a 72-66 victory on Feb. 6.

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Utah to scrap body measurements from transgender sports bill


Rep. Kera Birkeland, R-Morgan, speaks throughout an interview on the Utah State Capitol Wednesday, in Salt Lake Metropolis. Birkeland, a Republican who coaches junior varsity basketball when not within the statehouse, stated Wednesday that she was within the strategy of eradicating an inventory of bodily attributes from her proposed “College Exercise Eligibility Fee” — which might have used listed standards equivalent to bone density, hip-to-knee ratio, and oxygen saturation to find out eligibility. (Rick Bowmer, Related Press)

Estimated learn time: 5-6 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY — Transgender children would not be required to report sure physique measurements to play sports activities in Utah, however their participation would nonetheless be as much as a government-appointed panel of specialists beneath a proposal transferring via the Republican-controlled Legislature.

Rep. Kera Birkeland, a Republican who coaches junior varsity basketball, stated Wednesday that she was within the strategy of eradicating an inventory of bodily attributes from her proposed “College Exercise Eligibility Fee,” which might have used standards equivalent to bone density, hip-to-knee ratio, and oxygen saturation to find out eligibility.

The listing of bodily attributes provoked an outcry from dad and mom of transgender children and LGBTQ advocates, who worry student-athletes would really feel body-checked and focused by the fee.

“We’re nonetheless engaged on a few particulars. We simply need to ensure that it is legally tightened up and we deal with as lots of the issues that we are able to,” Birkeland stated, including that she anticipated the modifications to be launched within the subsequent day or two.

The latest model of the invoice would depart eligibility standards as much as the fee. Birkeland stated it might nonetheless take into account the attributes initially included as a part of the invoice, however would have extra flexibility to tailor decision-making to particular person sports activities, for instance, utilizing totally different standards for golf versus basketball.

“They will nonetheless take into account something that may give them athletic benefit. They’ll return and have a look at these issues and take into account hip-to-knee ratio. They’ll take into account that the muscle mass or peak … We do not need to pin-cushion them in and inform them, ‘Simply take into account these items,'” she stated.

Troy Williams, the chief director of Equality Utah, stated LGBTQ advocates anticipated modifications to be launched, however did not know the extent of them.

The revision got here as GOP-majority legislatures all through the U.S. debate banning transgender student-athletes from youth sports activities. Not less than 10 states have handed bans on transgender student-athletes in class sports activities.

Birkeland is proposing making a first-of-its-kind fee for Utah that transgender children could be required to go earlier than in the event that they need to compete in leagues that correspond with their gender id, fairly than the intercourse listed on their delivery certificates.

Birkeland, who led final yr’s failed push to ban transgender student-athletes from women’ sports activities in Utah, stated the fee balanced two legit competing priorities: guaranteeing transgender children do not feel ostracized and defending equity in women’ sports activities.

She has framed her proposal as a compromise that may enable transgender athletes to play, whereas nonetheless answering conservatives’ issues that these gamers might have a aggressive benefit in women’ sports activities. She hopes, if handed, the fee will not be challenged with lawsuits like bans in different states equivalent to Idaho.

Out of the 85,000 college students who play highschool sports activities within the state, 4 have gone via the Utah Excessive College Actions Affiliation’s transgender participation eligibility evaluation course of, the affiliation stated Tuesday. Birkeland stated she has heard of or noticed a minimum of eight extra competing.

Although the variety of athletes affected is central to the query at hand, she declined to substantiate that quantity, out of concern for student-athletes who might not need their gender id to be extensively publicized.

The Related Press final yr reached out to 2 dozen lawmakers within the greater than 20 states contemplating comparable measures and located that they might cite few situations the place transgender athletes enjoying highschool sports activities had been inflicting issues.

There aren’t any public accusations of a transgender gamers having aggressive benefits in Utah.

LGBTQ advocates and oldsters of transgender pupil athletes recoiled at the concept a panel would “physique verify” transgender student-athletes’ measurements — an concept that Birkeland stated her proposal would not require.

Birkeland stated transgender student-athletes might submit no matter data they needed to the proposed fee. But when they determined to not submit related information factors, they might be requested supplemental questions in regards to the standards as members decide whether or not they can pretty compete.

Williams, the chief director of Equality Utah, stated he did not know whether or not LGBTQ advocates would assist the invoice after modifications are made public.

Eradicating the listing bodily attributes from the invoice, he stated, would make the backgrounds of fee members extra consequential.

The fee would come with a coach, an athletic affiliation consultant and an athletic coach, along with physicians, statisticians and psychological well being professionals.

Williams believes it will likely be skewed towards transgender youth as a result of a minimum of half of its members would not be specialists in transgender well being, he stated.

“It does not try to strike a significant stability between the values of competitors and the values of participation and is weighted extra towards athletic specialists, versus individuals who have experience in transgender well being care,” Williams stated.

South Dakota Gov. Kristi Noem this month signed into regulation a ban on transgender women from enjoying in ladies’s sports activities on the youth and faculty stage and Indiana lawmakers handed a ban invoice Tuesday, sending it to Gov. Eric Holcomb for approval.

States that handed bans have not confronted boycotts like North Carolina did when the NCAA and NBA relocated occasions in response to the passage of a 2016 state regulation limiting which public restrooms transgender individuals might use.

However Birkeland’s ban proposal stalled final yr amid issues from Republican Gov. Spencer Cox, who fearful passing a ban might jeopardize efforts to deliver huge occasions to Utah.

Birkeland’s proposal should be finalized this week as a result of the Utah Legislature is scheduled to adjourn Friday.

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“This Was A Really Good Game For Us” | Utah Shows Resiliency In Win



Welcome to the dialog, Mike Conley.

After battling accidents late within the season the previous two years, Conley hasn’t been capable of finding his rhythm as he is been on a minutes restriction this yr.

Regardless of being an all-star final season, Conley has been thought-about considerably of an after-thought for a lot of the season within the eye of the nationwide media. Donovan Mitchell and Rudy Gobert get all of the headlines, and rightfully so, however there’s nonetheless one other star participant on the Jazz able to taking on a recreation.

That is what Conley did on Wednesday night time.

Regardless of main by 14 halfway by the fourth quarter and coping with a buzzer-beating three-pointer by Houston to drive time beyond regulation, Conley scored 9 factors in additional time as Utah picked up the 132-127 victory over the Rockets.

“This was a very good recreation for us,” head coach Quin Snyder stated postgame. “It was a recreation we are able to soak up and study from. … There’s not a whole lot of magic to what occurred, however there’s issues we all know are going to occur to us, and we want to have the ability to deal with them.”

With Mitchell and Gobert dominating for a lot of the sport, Utah led by 14 with simply over six minutes to play. However that lead evaporated because the Rockets took benefit of Utah’s carelessness with the ball, happening a 22-8 run to tie the sport at 114 with 30 seconds left.

That is when Conley took over.

He appeared to hit the game-winner when he knocked down a nook three-pointer with eight seconds left — a shot made attainable after an outstanding go by Mitchell out of a triple-team. However Christian Wooden knocked down a buzzer-beater for the Rockets, sending the sport into time beyond regulation.

The additional time was backwards and forwards till Conley got here up clutch once more. He scored Utah’s remaining 9 factors, together with a private 7-0 run, with two minutes left in time beyond regulation to offer the Jazz their third consecutive win.

Conley completed the night time with 15 factors, eight assists, 4 rebounds, and 4 steals, a masterful efficiency from somebody who dominated a recreation regardless of taking 10 pictures.

“Pictures weren’t falling for me personally. … However I had a pair actually attractiveness late in moments I am accustomed to performing in,” Conley stated postgame.

“I wasn’t pondering he was having a nasty night time. … I am pondering, ‘Once I watch him shoot, I am anticipating the ball to go in,'” Snyder stated of Conley.

Other than Conley’s late-game heroics, Mitchell and Gobert had been sensational for a lot of the night time.

Gobert appears absolutely recovered from his calf pressure suffered within the early a part of this month when he completed along with his third consecutive double-double since coming back from the all-star break. Going towards the undersized Rockets, Gobert was unstoppable within the paint as he completed with 27 factors, 17 rebounds, and two blocks on 12-of-14 capturing from the ground.

Whereas Gobert dealt with enterprise down low, Mitchell was the destroyer on the perimeter.

As he is executed since his return from a extreme concussion, Mitchell was lights out on the offensive finish. He completed with 37 factors, 10 assists, and three steals, capturing 13-of-27 from the ground. He exploded for 13 factors within the opening quarter, after which scored six in a row in time beyond regulation to maintain the Jazz shut.

“It feels good to return out of right here with a win, however we have gotta discover a approach not to surrender an 18-point lead,” Mitchell stated.

Regardless of taking part in on the backend of a back-to-back, the Rockets got here out on hearth, leaping out to a 9-4 lead on three three-pointers. However the Jazz, behind the play of Mitchell, reeled off a 10-0 run to take a 25-20 lead after one.

Houston rallied again to take a one-point lead halfway by the second earlier than Utah rallied as soon as once more. Starting with a Bojan Bogdanovic three-pointer and ending with a jumper of his, the Jazz went on a 21-3 run earlier than main 66-53 on the break.

The third quarter was a backwards and forwards affair as Utah was in a position to push its result in 17 on a number of events whereas the Rockets had been in a position to minimize it to single digits on multiple event. However the Jazz nonetheless went into the fourth quarter main by 10 and setting the stage for the thrilling end.

“I feel the best way we performed on the finish, I do not assume we deserved to win. … It was good we received an opportunity to redeem ourselves in time beyond regulation,” Gobert stated.

Bogdanovic completed with 18 factors and 5 rebounds, whereas Jordan Clarkson added 14 off the bench. Royce O’Neale was strong once more, ending with 9 factors, 9 rebounds, 4 assists, and nice protection on Rockets level guard Kevin Porter Jr.

Utah continues its roast journey when it faces the new-look New Orleans Pelicans on Friday night time. Tipoff is about for six p.m. MST.



Local Utah pie shop sells pastries to earn money for Ukraine


A bakery in South Jordan is now providing a candy gesture: for this week solely, they’re promoting “Ukraine Flag Flakies,” and all proceeds will go to Ukraine. (Sean Moody, KSL-TV)

Estimated learn time: 1-2 minutes

SOUTH JORDAN — There are numerous tales of Utahns stepping as much as assist the folks of Ukraine. A bakery in South Jordan is providing a candy gesture: For this week solely, they’re promoting “Ukraine Flag Flakies,” and all proceeds will go to Ukraine.

John Mercier opened Flake Pie Firm in the midst of the pandemic in November 2020.

“It was undoubtedly a threat,” Mercier stated. “We felt that it was one thing that personal-sized pies was one thing that was distinctive.”

Whipping up scrumptious pies, filled with goodness and enjoyable, intelligent names like Peanut Butter is My Jam or When Chocolate Met Caramel – Flake Pie is filling folks’s candy cravings.

Mercier watched with the remainder of the world the assault on Ukraine and needed to unfold somewhat pleasure.

“We’re very saddened as an organization,” he stated. “We created this particular Ukraine Flag Flakie. It is bought blueberries, blackberries, strawberries — and we put that on the within.”

The frosting is coloured blue and yellow representing the Ukrainian flag. They value $3.50 every or $12.50 for a four-pack. All proceeds will profit the folks of Ukraine.

“We’re tremendous overwhelmed with the outpouring of help for it. We bought simply over 200 yesterday alone,” stated Mercier.

Mercier has no ties to Ukraine. He simply felt compelled to serve up somewhat cheer.

“We simply felt like now could be the time. We do not need to wait one other day,” he stated.

Proceeds will go to the Care Ukraine Disaster Fund. You’ll be able to come into the store at 1655 Towne Middle Dr. in South Jordan or order on-line at www.flakepie.com.

The deal is thru this week solely.

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Why a team of Russian biathletes in Utah is banned from competition


Skiers compete within the 2022 Biathlon Youth and Junior World Championships at Soldier Hole Nordic Middle in Halfway on Wednesday. A crew of eight younger Russian biathletes has not competed for the reason that Worldwide Biathlon Union took motion Saturday to strip them of any nationwide symbols, together with their flag. (Laura Seitz, Deseret Information)

Estimated learn time: 3-4 minutes

MIDWAY — A crew of eight younger Russian biathletes in Utah for the Worldwide Biathlon Union’s 2022 Youth and Junior World Championships that finish Wednesday at Soldier Hole aren’t being ostracized by their fellow rivals over their nation’s invasion of Ukraine, a prime U.S. biathlon official mentioned.

“I have never seen something like that. I feel all people acknowledges these are younger athletes that aren’t concerned in something that is remotely political,” mentioned Max Cobb, CEO of the Maine-based U.S. Biathlon Affiliation and an government board member of the Worldwide Biathlon Union in Austria.

“I feel all people’s been very respectful,” he mentioned. “It is a horrible scenario for certain.”

The Russians, who’re 19 to 21 years previous, haven’t competed for the reason that worldwide federation took motion Saturday to strip them of any nationwide symbols, together with their flag, Cobb mentioned, his voice practically drowned out at occasions by the exuberant athletes on the Halfway nordic snowboarding venue constructed for the 2002 Winter Video games.

Now the union has gone additional, voting late Tuesday to ban Russian and Belarusian athletes from the season’s remaining world cup and different worldwide competitions as a present of solidarity with Ukraine, now underneath assault from Russia with help from neighboring Belarus.

The motion comes after the Worldwide Olympic Committee urged Russian and Belarusian athletes to be barred from competing in different international locations, a rare step taken “with a view to defend the integrity of world sports activities competitions and for the security of all of the members.”

Skiers from America and Sweden compete in the 2022 Biathlon Youth and Junior World Championships at Soldier Hollow Nordic Center in Midway on Wednesday.  A team of eight young Russian biathletes have not competed since the international federation took action Saturday to strip them of any national symbols, including their flag.
Skiers from America and Sweden compete within the 2022 Biathlon Youth and Junior World Championships at Soldier Hole Nordic Middle in Halfway on Wednesday. A crew of eight younger Russian biathletes haven’t competed for the reason that worldwide federation took motion Saturday to strip them of any nationwide symbols, together with their flag. (Photograph: Laura Seitz, Deseret Information)

The choice means the Russian crew, scheduled to go away Utah on Thursday, will not be capable of take part within the remaining day of competitors. There aren’t any Belarusians competing, and Ukraine didn’t ship any athletes to Utah. However the blue-and-yellow Ukrainian flag is flying above the end line at Soldier Hole to sign assist.

“We’re attempting to maintain the environment good right here for everyone,” Cobb mentioned. “This warfare is tragic. It is exhausting to imagine there is a floor warfare in Europe in 2022 and our hearts exit to the Ukrainians who’ve been attacked and the very, very dire scenario they’re in. It is unimaginable.”

He mentioned as a sports activities group, “our half is round bringing individuals collectively and holding pleasant competitions. It is unhappy to see one of many very concerned nations in our sport engaged in an offensive act like this. And tragic for the Ukrainian individuals and the Ukrainian biathlon program.”

The casualties of the battle coming into a seventh day embrace a 19-year-old former Ukrainian biathlete Yevhen Malyshev, who died serving within the Ukrainian army. The union supplied its “deepest condolences on the loss,” and condemned the aggression by Russia and Belarus, expressing hope for a right away finish to the warfare.

Cobb mentioned the soldier hadn’t competed internationally however was a junior-level competitor in Ukraine till just a few years in the past. Biathlon, a sport that mixes cross-country snowboarding and rifle taking pictures in a single race, began as a army train.

“It is actually exhausting,” Cobb mentioned of listening to concerning the loss of life. “It was actually very unhappy.”

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Malnourished Utah woman case is most ‘gruesome’ doctor has seen, charges say


A South Salt Lake man was charged Wednesday with aggravated abuse of a weak grownup after police say his malnourished daughter had been residing in deplorable situations. (lusia83, Shutterstock)

Estimated learn time: 2-3 minutes

SOUTH SALT LAKE — A South Salt Lake man faces a felony prison cost accusing him of not correctly caring for his grownup daughter in a case that one physician known as some of the ugly he is seen in his profession.

The 60-year-old man was charged Wednesday in third District Court docket with aggravated abuse of a weak grownup, a third-degree felony.

The investigation started on Dec. 26 when police had been known as to St. Mark’s Hospital the place an ambulance had delivered a lady who was dehydrated, malnourished, and “lined in feces,” in keeping with charging paperwork.

A physician informed police that he had “seen some ugly issues in (his) profession, however this can be the worst,” the fees state.

The girl was not being fed and her enamel weren’t cared for, and “she has solely been in a position to eat ice cream, bitter cream and hen broth for the previous 18 months,” the physician informed investigators, in keeping with the fees. The physician additional acknowledged that the girl “has not showered in a 12 months, solely weighs 65 kilos and is tremendous emaciated,” and had feces caked underneath her fingernails.

When the South Salt Lake Hearth Division discovered the girl, she was “laying on a rubbish bag” with feces throughout her, the fees state. Police say her father informed emergency crews that it had been “per week or two” since his daughter had eaten or drank something. The girl additional informed crews that she has not been in a position to get off the bed for a few month as a result of “she appears like she’s going to go out” and he or she can’t stroll by herself.

She additionally stated she couldn’t eat as a result of “all her enamel are damaged” and it harm to eat, the fees say.

The daddy allegedly informed emergency crews that his daughter had been bedridden for a month and he had not sought any medical consideration for her.

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Utah health officials report 19 COVID deaths as US Navy arrives to support hospital staff


Dr. Kencee Graves talks with members of the U.S. Navy as they arrive to help the College of Utah Hospital in Salt Lake Metropolis on Wednesday. (Kristin Murphy, Deseret Information)

Estimated learn time: 4-5 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah well being officers reported 19 COVID-19 deaths on Wednesday, together with 461 new instances.

The rolling, seven-day common for brand new optimistic checks is now 405 per day. The seven-day common for optimistic checks is at the moment 13.2%, persevering with a decline, in line with the Utah Division of Well being.

It additionally reported Wednesday that one other 3,882 folks in Utah have been examined and a couple of,434 have been vaccinated. And, faculty kids accounted for 45 of the 461 new instances. Of these, 25 instances have been kids between ages 5 and 10, 5 have been ages 11-13, and 15 have been ages 14-17.

At the moment, 306 persons are hospitalized within the state with COVID-19, in line with the well being division, with 63 of these sufferers in intensive care. A number of weeks in the past, in mid-January, there have been greater than 600 folks hospitalized with COVID-19, together with a whole bunch within the ICU.

ICU capability is now at 71%, and ICU referral facilities are 73% full — each beneath the warning ranges.

On the peak of the omicron variant’s affect on the state’s hospitals, there have been 853 COVID-19 patents hospitalized. Now the state is on the lowest COVID-19 hospitalization ranges that it has seen since July 22, shortly after the delta variant grew to become prevalent in Utah.

U.S. Navy helps with surgical procedure backlog

A medical group of 20 United States Navy officers despatched by the nation’s Division of Protection arrived on the College of Utah Hospital on Wednesday to begin a 30-day deployment to help with a backlog of surgical procedures.

Surgical procedures have been placed on maintain whereas the omicron variant took lots of the hospital’s assets. Having further medically skilled folks will imply the hospital can open extra beds and reschedule surgical procedures which were placed on maintain.

This deployment is a part of the Division of Protection’s efforts to help the whole-of-government response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and is in collaboration with state leaders, in line with a U. Well being press launch.

“Whereas we’re seeing declining numbers in COVID instances, 52 beds stay out of service due to staffing shortages,” Dr. Michael Good, CEO at College of Utah Well being, mentioned.

He mentioned the hospital deferred a whole bunch of surgical procedures and was compelled into “onerous choices” relating to whether or not to take switch sufferers through the wave of omicron variant COVID-19 infections.

“Due to FEMA and with the assistance of colleagues from the Division of Protection, which is able to give attention to treating COVID-positive sufferers, we will start to handle these challenges and supply wanted care to all sufferers in Utah and all through the Mountain West,” Good mentioned.

The medical group of physicians, respiratory therapists, directors and primarily nurses will give attention to direct affected person care wants.

The press launch defined that the U. Hospital is commonly the very best or solely choice for essentially the most complicated sufferers within the space, and that help from the federal authorities will enable for these sufferers to be served extra shortly.

“We’re grateful for this help … and the continuing collaboration with our state leaders to assist restore our operations.” Good mentioned.

Just lately reported COVID-19 deaths

In Wednesday’s report, well being officers introduced 19 new deaths, bringing the state’s COVID-19 loss of life toll to 4,436 all through the pandemic.

Of people that died with COVID-19, 43.4% had a pre-existing situation, 81.3% have been thought-about excessive danger as a result of they have been over 65 or had a pre-existing situation, and 59.6% have been hospitalized after they died. Males have accounted for simply over 60% of the COVID-19 deaths in Utah.

The deaths reported Wednesday symbolize 10 totally different counties all through the state. Solely one of many people was youthful than 65, and 11 have been older than 85.

The most recent COVID-19 deaths in Utah embody:

  • A Tooele County lady between 65 and 84, it’s unknown whether or not she was hospitalized or at a long-term care facility.
  • A Salt Lake County lady, over 85, long-term care facility resident.
  • A Davis County lady, over 85, unknown if hospitalized or in a long-term care facility.
  • A Juab County lady, over 85, unknown if hospitalized or in a long-term care facility.
  • A Weber County lady, 65-84, unknown if hospitalized or in a long-term care facility.
  • A Utah County man, over 85, not hospitalized.
  • A Utah County lady, over 85, not hospitalized.
  • A Sevier County man, over 85, unknown if hospitalized or in a long-term care facility.
  • A Salt Lake County man, 65-84, hospitalized.
  • A Cache County man, 65-84, unknown if hospitalized or in a long-term care facility.
  • A Washington County man, over 85, not hospitalized.
  • A Uintah County man, over 85, not hospitalized.
  • A Salt Lake County man, over 85, not hospitalized.
  • Two Salt Lake County males, 65-84, each not hospitalized.
  • A Washington County man, 65-84, not hospitalized.
  • A Utah County man, over 85, hospitalized.
  • A Salt Lake County man, over 85, unknown if hospitalized or in a long-term care facility.
  • A Uintah County lady, 45-64, hospitalized.

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Utah health officials report 19 COVID deaths as Navy sends aid to hospitals to support staff


Dr. Kencee Graves talks with members of the U.S. Navy as they arrive to assist the College of Utah Hospital in Salt Lake Metropolis on Wednesday. The Utah Division of Well being reported 461 instances and 19 deaths within the newest day by day COVID-19 report. (Kristin Murphy, Deseret Information)

Estimated learn time: 2-3 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah well being officers reported 19 COVID-19 deaths on Wednesday, together with 461 new instances.

The rolling seven-day common for brand spanking new optimistic assessments is now 405 per day. The seven-day common for optimistic assessments is at present 13.2%, persevering with a decline.

The well being division reported one other 3,882 individuals who had been examined and a couple of,434 who had been vaccinated.

Faculty kids account for 45 of the 461 new instances. Of these instances, 25 had been kids between ages 5 and 10, 5 had been kids 11-13, and 15 had been kids 14-17.

At present, 306 individuals are hospitalized within the state with COVID-19, in accordance with the Utah Division of Well being.

U.S. Navy helps with surgical procedure backlog

A medical group of 20 United States Navy officers despatched by the Division of Protection arrived on the College of Utah Hospital on Wednesday to begin a 30-day deployment to assist with a backlog of surgical procedures.

These surgical procedures had been placed on maintain whereas the omicron variant took lots of the hospital’s assets. Having extra educated medical individuals will imply the hospital can open extra beds and reschedule surgical procedures that had been placed on maintain.

This deployment is a part of the Division of Protection’s efforts to assist the whole-of-government response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and is in collaboration with state leaders, in accordance with a U of U press launch.

“Whereas we’re seeing declining numbers in COVID instances, 52 beds stay out of service due to staffing shortages,” mentioned Dr. Michael Good, CEO of College of Utah Well being.

He mentioned the hospital deferred tons of of surgical procedures and was compelled into laborious selections concerning whether or not to take switch sufferers in the course of the omicron COVID-19 wave.

“Due to FEMA and with the assistance of colleagues from the Division of Protection, which is able to concentrate on treating COVID-positive sufferers, we will start to handle these challenges and supply wanted care to all sufferers in Utah and all through the Mountain West,” Good mentioned.

This story can be up to date.

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Utah health officials report 19 COVID deaths as Navy sends support to hospitals to support staff


Dr. Kencee Graves talks with members of the U.S. Navy as they arrive to assist the College of Utah Hospital in Salt Lake Metropolis on Wednesday. The Utah Division of Well being reported 461 instances and 19 deaths within the newest day by day COVID-19 report. (Kristin Murphy, Deseret Information)

Estimated learn time: 2-3 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah well being officers reported 19 COVID-19 deaths on Wednesday, together with 461 new instances.

The rolling seven-day common for brand new constructive exams is now 405 per day. The seven-day common for constructive exams is at the moment 13.2%, persevering with a decline.

The well being division reported one other 3,882 individuals who have been examined and a pair of,434 who have been vaccinated.

Faculty kids account for 45 of the 461 new instances. Of these instances, 25 have been kids between ages 5 and 10, 5 have been kids 11-13, and 15 have been kids 14-17.

Presently, 306 individuals are hospitalized within the state with COVID-19, in keeping with the Utah Division of Well being.

U.S. Navy helps with surgical procedure backlog

A medical group of 20 United States Navy officers despatched by the Division of Protection arrived on the College of Utah Hospital on Wednesday to begin a 30-day deployment to assist with a backlog of surgical procedures.

These surgical procedures have been placed on maintain whereas the omicron variant took most of the hospital’s sources. Having further skilled medical folks will imply the hospital can open extra beds and reschedule surgical procedures that have been placed on maintain.

This deployment is a part of the Division of Protection’s efforts to assist the whole-of-government response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and is in collaboration with state leaders, in keeping with a U of U press launch.

“Whereas we’re seeing declining numbers in COVID instances, 52 beds stay out of service due to staffing shortages,” mentioned Dr. Michael Good, CEO of College of Utah Well being.

He mentioned the hospital deferred lots of of surgical procedures and was pressured into laborious selections relating to whether or not to take switch sufferers in the course of the omicron COVID-19 wave.

“Because of FEMA and with the assistance of colleagues from the Division of Protection, which can concentrate on treating COVID-positive sufferers, we are able to start to handle these challenges and supply wanted care to all sufferers in Utah and all through the Mountain West,” Good mentioned.

This story will likely be up to date.

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