Gov. Spencer Cox bans Russian-branded products from state liquor stores in executive order


Based on a information launch, all Russia-produced and Russian-branded merchandise can be faraway from DABC retailer cabinets till the order is rescinded.

(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) Liquor management stoppers known as Bergs on new bottles on Friday, Jan. 28, 2022 at Lake Impact cocktail bar in downtown Salt Lake Metropolis. On Feb. 26, Gov. Spencer Cox ordered the elimination of all Russian-branded merchandise from state liquor shops in response to the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

In response to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, Gov. Spencer Cox issued an govt order on Saturday to take away all Russian-produced and Russian-branded merchandise from state liquor shops.

The chief order can even require the Governor’s Workplace of Financial Alternative to assessment state procurements for every other financial relationships with Russia, based on a information launch from the governor’s workplace.

Russia launched its assault on the Jap European nation early Thursday, and the governor condemned the assault in a Tweet posted from his official account earlier this week.

“Russia’s ruthless assault on a sovereign nation is an egregious violation of human rights,” Cox mentioned within the launch. “Utah stands in solidarity with Ukraine and won’t help Russian enterprises, irrespective of how small the change.”

Based on the order, Utah will take “no matter measures doable” to help the individuals of Ukraine, and Russian-branded merchandise is not going to return to state liquor shops till the order is rescinded.



Facing stalking order, group sues Salt Lake City again over century-old theater


Casey McDonough, left, and Michael Valentine, proper, co-founders of the Mates of the Utah Pantages Theater, share public information they’ve collected concerning Utah Pantages Theater on Feb. 8. The group filed a lawsuit towards Salt Lake Metropolis over the way forward for the theater on Thursday. (Carter Williams, KSL.com)

Estimated learn time: 7-8 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY — The Utah Pantages Theater, in its heyday, introduced in such comedy legends as Will Rogers, Bud Abbott and Lou Costello.

However the theater’s potential closing act is popping into fairly a drama.

In one more flip within the authorized struggle over the way forward for the century-old downtown constructing, which is slated to be knocked down later this 12 months, leaders of a bunch preventing to protect the theater are suing Salt Lake Metropolis and its redevelopment company over its 2019 settlement to promote the constructing.

The lawsuit was filed simply weeks after the developer that now owns the constructing filed a stalking injunction towards one of many group’s founders, searching for to maintain him away from the constructing earlier than it is demolished later this 12 months.

Members of the group Mates of the Utah Pantages Theater filed the lawsuit in third District Courtroom on Thursday. The criticism facilities on town’s course of and resolution to switch the theater to the worldwide growth firm Hines for $0 in 2019. A spokesperson for Salt Lake Metropolis Mayor’s Workplace instructed KSL.com town is conscious of the lawsuit and metropolis attorneys are at present reviewing it.

The homeowners of two native companies, Twisted Roots and Beckett & Robb, additionally joined the lawsuit as plaintiffs, stating the choice adversely affected them as a result of they had been compelled to shut and relocate their Foremost Road outlets after the switch of the constructing was finalized late final 12 months.

The plaintiffs are searching for a judgment that may void the 2019 settlement, citing violations of Utah code. For the reason that metropolis not has management of the constructing, they’re additionally searching for an injunction that may forestall town from issuing permits that may enable Hines to demolish the constructing.

The contractor employed by Hines to tear down the constructing filed a demolition allow request final month. Their request remains to be pending evaluate as of this week, in response to metropolis information.

A consultant for Hines filed a stalking injunction towards Michael Valentine — one of many founders of Mates of the Utah Pantages Theater — every week after the allow request was filed.

The paperwork filed in third District Courtroom reveals the corporate is searching for to maintain Valentine away from the theater due to what they name “excessive threatening conduct.”

Valentine additionally made a court docket look Thursday to plead his aspect within the injunction. He instructed KSL.com that he believes that it is all an try and maintain him away from the theater earlier than it is torn down.

“This can be a fairly baseless stalking injunction. … They’re attempting to maintain us away from this theater, away from this matter, away from the general public, and I feel (this) is only a continuation of that,” he mentioned every week after the injunction was filed.

He added later that he plans to file a counterclaim towards Hines over the ordeal.

How we acquired right here

Advocates for the century-old Utah Pantages Theater have squabbled with Salt Lake Metropolis over the destiny of the constructing for almost three years.

The Utah Pantages Theater opened in 1920 however it has been vacant for a while. Salt Lake Metropolis’s redevelopment company acquired the property for $5.5 million in 2010 and continued to publicly voice plans to protect the theater by means of at the least 2016; the data that the plaintiffs dug up in information requests reveals how the temper had modified by 2018.

Town’s RDA wrote on a web site that it estimates it could price between $40 million to $80 million to retrofit and restore the constructing, which is why it started to maneuver away from the concept of preserving it.

A part of the rivalry is the price. The estimates from comparable theaters refurbished over the previous decade point out it could possibly be finished for much less, Valentine says. A plan to revive the Pantages theater in Tacoma, Washington, launched in 2018, for instance, price rather less than $25 million, in response to the Information Tribune.

Homeowners of the constructing is also eligible for state and federal tax credit towards restoration initiatives if the constructing was listed on the Nationwide Register of Historic Locations.

Then, in late 2019, town agreed to the cope with Hines for $0. The developer’s plans name for a 31-story, 368-foot high-rise on Foremost Road to interchange the theater.

The lawsuit filed Thursday is the third lawsuit within the matter. Valentine and Casey McDonough, one other founding father of Mates of the Utah Pantages Theater, first filed a lawsuit towards town over a failed poll measure. A decide sided with town however it has since been appealed to the Utah Supreme Courtroom.

The newest case

What the plaintiffs argue within the new lawsuit is that town violated Utah legal guidelines in its means of handing over the constructing for demolition.

Whereas it is not on the Nationwide Register of Historic Locations, specialists from each Preservation Utah and the Utah State Preservation Workplace instructed metropolis officers that it both was or may have been eligible for that standing previous to the 2019 settlement, in response to paperwork.

One state statute says redevelopment companies should undergo a collection of processes earlier than shifting ahead with a plan as soon as a constructing is set to be historic. Valentine says these procedures weren’t adopted, thus he believes the deal is illegitimate.

“We’re saying the theater must be transferred again to town and these processes should be adopted in an open and clear manner,” he mentioned. “They by no means submitted the theater (for the historic report), they did not comply with this code. They deny the theater was eligible proper up by means of November 2021 after we completed our software and submitted the theater for the registry.”

Casey McDonough, left, and Michael Valentine, right, co-founders of the Friends of the Utah Pantages Theater, share contents from a binder of public records they've collected regarding Utah Pantages Theater. during an interview with KSL.com on Feb. 8. The group filed a lawsuit against Salt Lake City over the future of the Utah Pantages Theater on Thursday.
Casey McDonough, left, and Michael Valentine, proper, co-founders of the Mates of the Utah Pantages Theater, share contents from a binder of public information they’ve collected concerning Utah Pantages Theater. throughout an interview with KSL.com on Feb. 8. The group filed a lawsuit towards Salt Lake Metropolis over the way forward for the Utah Pantages Theater on Thursday. (Photograph: Carter Williams, KSL)

Town’s RDA web site acknowledges that Utah State Historic Preservation Workplace was trying into the matter final 12 months. In a single letter from the state preservation workplace dated Nov. 6, 2019, earlier than the $0 deal was introduced, a member from the preservation workplace wrote that there weren’t any ensures the theater would land on the register, however they wrote “it does have an opportunity and is actually price attempting.”

In keeping with the RDA web site, town contends the workplace did not take up the difficulty itself till March 2021. Emails and different paperwork submitted as proof within the lawsuit present town’s Historic Landmark Fee acknowledged on Nov. 4, 2021, that there could be a state assembly concerning the constructing on Nov. 18. Town nonetheless had possession of the constructing on the time because the settlement wasn’t finalized.

However a Hines lawyer despatched an e mail to the Utah State Preservation Workplace on Nov. 10, 2021 — the day the transaction was finalized — objecting to the nomination. Hines wrote that the constructing was “past restore and there may be not a financially viable use for restoration.”

And the matter apparently ended there.

Since metropolis officers say they’re nonetheless reviewing the lawsuit, they didn’t touch upon it. A spokesperson for Hines mentioned the corporate was unaware of the lawsuit.

Why care concerning the theater?

The brand new lawsuit can also be probably not the final authorized matter to be filed within the courts. The group can also be trying into different potential missteps uncovered in public information paperwork, in response to Valentine.

He and McDonough say they have been contained in the theater and seen its potential, which is why they’ve invested a lot time on the theater. Their final objective is to return it to its former glory. They view it as a novel constructing that they imagine generally is a public area residents would get pleasure from and a venue that brings individuals in for large occasions.


It has been form of a historic preservation second of speaking about these buildings in our metropolis. It has began a dialog, which is cool.

–Michael Valentine


On the identical time, they’re metropolis residents who proceed to query how the deal shook out. Valentine has an actual property background and says he is not sure how any constructing — even an getting old theater — misplaced worth from $5.5 million in 2010 to $4 million 9 years later when the remainder of the neighborhood property values skyrocketed. That is even earlier than the $4 million was waved off.

The lawsuits, they defined, emerged after they mentioned they had been rebuffed by metropolis officers each time they tried to deliver up questions and start dialogues over the plan for the theater.

“If it was a personal developer and a personal developer exchanging property, making a deal, then we would not have any argument,” McDonough mentioned. “However now we have an RDA utilizing our tax {dollars} with metropolis property making a cope with this billion-dollar developer.”

Valentine and McDonough say that it is also been well worth the struggle as a result of it is introduced preservation points to the forefront, which is why they do not foresee themselves giving up anytime quickly.

“It has been form of a historic preservation second of speaking about these buildings in our metropolis,” Valentine provides. “It has began a dialog, which is cool.”

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‘Law & Order’ reboot continues with tradition : NPR


The unique collection, which debuted in 1990, leaned closely on present information tales. The brand new present does the identical. Its debut episode facilities on the crimes of a TV persona harking back to Invoice Cosby.



TERRY GROSS, HOST:

That is FRESH AIR. The NBC drama collection “Regulation & Order” premiered in 1990 and was televised till 2010, spawning a number of spinoff collection alongside the best way. However this week, the unique “Regulation & Order” resumes after a 12-year hiatus. It is a continuation, not a reboot. Our TV critic David Bianculli has this have a look at the present’s historical past and influence, in addition to the contents of this new incarnation. Here is his evaluation.

(SOUNDBITE OF “LAW AND ORDER” SOUND EFFECT)

DAVID BIANCULLI, BYLINE: That sound, which has signaled a transition between scenes on NBC’s “Regulation & Order” and all its many spinoffs for many years, has turn into one of the vital recognizable sounds on tv. That is principally as a result of it appears to have been round endlessly, and in TV historical past phrases, it nearly has. The unique “Regulation & Order” collection began in 1990, nearly a full decade earlier than the premiers of “The West Wing” and “The Sopranos.” Sequence creator Dick Wolf, who had labored as a producer on “Miami Vice,” launched “Regulation & Order” as a drama collection that, in essence, was two collection in a single. The legislation portion was a cop present, exhibiting how the police solved the crime and arrested the prime suspect. And the order half was the courtroom drama, exhibiting how the prosecutors constructed their case towards the accused and argued it at trial.

The idea for “Regulation & Order” wasn’t authentic. The identical fundamental construction was used within the ABC drama collection “Arrest And Trial” approach again in 1963, starring Ben Gazzara because the cop and Chuck Connors because the protection legal professional. However the concept was one and allowed “Regulation & Order” over its 20 years to cycle by means of a number of forged adjustments with out lacking a beat. What remained fixed all through was the construction of the present, the on-location capturing in New York and the usage of out there Broadway actors as visitor stars. If you happen to had been a stage actor in New York from 1990 to 2010 and did not have a credit score on “Regulation & Order” in your resume, you wanted a brand new agent.

When “Regulation & Order” closed down 12 years in the past, its common forged members included Anthony Anderson, later of “Black-ish,” as Detective Kevin Bernard and Sam Waterston, later of “The Newsroom,” as Assistant District Legal professional Jack McCoy. They’re each again for this 2022 model, teamed with new characters and gamers, together with Camryn Manheim. Anderson’s detective, for instance, is now paired with Frank Cosgrove, a white cop performed by Jeffrey Donovan, previously of “Burn Discover” and Season 2 of TV’s “Fargo.” Donovan’s a wonderful actor, however even he cannot promote among the dialogue right here, which is so clunky it is painful. The previous “Regulation & Order” all the time had the repute of getting its crimes and points ripped from the headlines but in addition had the repute of being apparent and stilted with its dealing with of these points. The brand new “Regulation & Order” continues that custom.

Here is a scene wherein Kevin and Frank method a younger Black man on the road to query him and tempers run so excessive that Frank is pulled away by his companion. Instantly afterward, Frank complains about being handled unfairly.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, “LAW AND ORDER”)

JEFFREY DONOVAN: (As Frank Cosgrove) Are you kidding me? These younger children – they obtained no respect. They get to say and do no matter they need. It is like a free move.

ANTHONY ANDERSON: (As Kevin Bernard) I am undecided what you imply by that.

DONOVAN: (As Frank Cosgrove) I imply, I am white. He is Black. I say the flawed factor, and my profession is over.

ANDERSON: (As Kevin Bernard) Perhaps.

DONOVAN: (As Frank Cosgrove) Perhaps? Is there one other approach of taking a look at this?

ANDERSON: (As Kevin Bernard) Hey, Frank, you got here at him scorching, man.

DONOVAN: (As Frank Cosgrove) I confirmed him my badge, and I mentioned, the way you doing? How’s that coming off scorching? Ought to I’ve provided him a croissant and invited him to tea on the St. Regis?

ANDERSON: (As Kevin Bernard) Perhaps it’s best to have handled him a bit extra well mannered, like a law-abiding citizen minding his personal rattling enterprise.

DONOVAN: (As Frank Cosgrove) Reality is, it is these rattling telephones. They’ve ruined all the things.

ANDERSON: (As Kevin Bernard) OK. That is a method of taking a look at it.

DONOVAN: (As Frank Cosgrove) The opposite?

ANDERSON: (As Kevin Bernard) They maintain us accountable.

BIANCULLI: There is a completely different kind of built-in battle on the Order half of the present. Sam Waterston’s Jack McCoy has been promoted. He’s now the DA in cost, and he oversees a brand new employees of assistants, together with Hugh Dancy as Nolan Worth. And he is upset within the season premiere episode by the best way the police extract a confession from the defendant, however McCoy will not be.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, “LAW AND ORDER”)

SAM WATERSTON: (As Jack McCoy) This case is front-page information, Nolan.

HUGH DANCY: (As Nolan Worth) I get it. However with all due respect, that is not related. While you requested me to come back right here, you mentioned, I want somebody who sees the world by means of a unique lens, somebody with the heart to make onerous choices.

WATERSTON: (As Jack McCoy) I bear in mind. I nonetheless really feel that approach. However it’s a authorized confession, Nolan. Cops are allowed to lie.

DANCY: (As Nolan Worth) They’re. However it makes the confession much less dependable, much less moral.

WATERSTON: (As Jack McCoy) No. If it is authorized, it is moral.

BIANCULLI: The case itself, the one they’re prosecuting, is essentially the most incendiary facet of this in any other case typical new model of “Regulation & Order.” The fictional case includes the homicide of a well-liked celeb named Henry King, accused of drugging and raping 40 ladies. It is apparent that this episode is ripped from headlines tied to Invoice Cosby. And that is noteworthy, if for no different motive, as a result of when the unique “Regulation & Order” premiered on NBC, two of the community’s prime 5 TV reveals had been from Cosby, “The Cosby Present” and “A Totally different World.” Invoice Cosby dominated NBC then and was answerable for its reversal of fortune from third place to first. At this time, as “Regulation & Order” returns for Season 21, Cosby is getting used as nameless inspiration for simply one other TV plot.

And this new “Regulation & Order,” make no mistake, is simply one other TV version of the identical acquainted present, one other cog in a really dependable machine. From its memorable theme music by Mike Publish to the fast tempo of it’s-just-the-facts-ma’am plot factors, this new “Regulation & Order” season is rather like all of the others. That makes it a watchable present, not an amazing one. However it’s nonetheless not a criticism. At a time when all the printed networks are churning out extra recreation and actuality reveals than scripted collection in primetime, the return of the old school “Regulation & Order” is a step ahead, in addition to a nod backward.

GROSS: David Bianculli is a professor of tv research at Rowan College in New Jersey. “Regulation & Order” premiers tomorrow on NBC. Tomorrow on FRESH AIR, it’s possible you’ll be squeamish about bugs, however might people dwell in a world with out them? Bugs play important roles in pollinating crops we eat, breaking down waste in forest soil and forming the bottom of a meals chain for different animals. Our visitor might be environmental author Oliver Milman, who explores the troubling decline in insect populations in his new ebook, “The Insect Disaster.” I hope you will be part of us.

(SOUNDBITE OF MIKE POST’S “LAW AND ORDER – MAIN THEME”)

GROSS: Our technical director and engineer is Audrey Bentham, with further engineering right this moment from Al Banks. Our interviews and critiques are produced and edited by Amy Salit, Phyllis Myers, Sam Briger, Lauren Krenzel, Heidi Saman, Therese Madden, Ann Marie Baldonado, Thea Chaloner, Seth Kelley and Kayla Lattimore. Our digital media producer is Molly Seavy-Nesper. I am Terry Gross.

(SOUNDBITE OF MIKE POST’S “LAW AND ORDER – MAIN THEME”)

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