For Ukraine, Far Too Little, Too Late


The world is lastly rallying, although not but sufficient, to save lots of Ukraine because it fights, alone, within the largest land battle in Europe since 1945. With Kyiv below siege from Russian tanks, air strikes, and artillery hearth, lights on international landmarks have been ablaze with the blue and yellow of the Ukrainian flag. In Europe, the symbols of shock have flashed on the Eiffel Tower in Paris, Rome’s Colosseum, the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, and London’s No. 10 Downing Road. From Santiago to Sydney and Sacramento, from Tokyo and Taipei to Tel Aviv, protesters have raged at Vladimir Putin for his barbarous marketing campaign to beat Ukraine. Regardless of the pandemic, huge crowds have poured onto streets, carrying placards, and mobilized in anger in entrance of Russian embassies or in sympathy at Ukrainian missions. At a protest in Germany that drew 100 thousand, one lady had “STOP PUTIN” written throughout her masks.

Governments all over the world face rising stress to do extra to cease Russia—or deal with the political penalties. One of the putting protests was in Georgia, the place hundreds turned out in entrance of Parliament, in Tbilisi, to demand the resignation of Prime Minister Irakli Garibashvili after he refused to hitch the worldwide transfer to sanction Putin’s regime. The anger has even hit the vodka market in america, with bars pulling Russian manufacturers off cabinets and the governors of Ohio and New Hampshire banning their sale. In a departure from its conventional opening skit, “Saturday Evening Dwell” turned the stage over to the Ukrainian Refrain Dumka of New York, who sang the hymn “Prayer for Ukraine.” The phase ended with the digital camera panning to a show of candles that spelled “Kyiv.”

But President Volodymyr Zelensky, in each day video messages from the embattled capital that he refuses to flee, has angrily and plaintively appealed to the world for extra army support and extra tangible motion—and, on Saturday, to the European Union to urgently admit Ukraine as a member. He spoke with leaders in Washington, New Delhi, Rome, London, Ankara, and Warsaw, whereas nonetheless making an attempt to defend a nation below siege. The worldwide response has gained momentum, though absolutely not sufficient to alter Putin’s thoughts or finish his ruthless battle anytime quickly. Extra columns of T-72 tanks rumbled throughout the border all through the weekend. The disaster might effectively take a very long time to completely resolve its many layers, a senior Biden Administration official acknowledged on Friday. “I feel that is going to play out not over days, not over weeks, perhaps not even over months, however probably over years,” he advised me and a small group of columnists.

Within the first, if tepid, signal of hope, Russia on Sunday proposed talks with Ukraine on the border of Belarus. However, on the identical time, Putin ordered his nuclear forces on excessive alert—which suggests readiness to launch—in response to what he known as “aggressive statements” by leaders of nations within the NATO alliance. On the eve of the invasion, Zelensky had tried to phone Putin to attraction for negotiations, however the Russian chief wouldn’t take the decision. Former U.S. officers are skeptical of Putin’s intent. “I personally am not one for trusting something the Russians say, so we’ll need to see, however I feel it’s a optimistic signal,” James Clapper, the previous director of Nationwide Intelligence, stated on Sunday, on CNN. Putin, he added, now seems to be “unhinged.” On Friday, the State Division dismissed talks whereas battle raged. “Now we see Moscow suggesting that diplomacy happen on the barrel of a gun or as Moscow’s rockets, mortars, artillery goal the Ukrainian folks,” Ned Worth, the spokesman, advised reporters. “These usually are not the circumstances for actual diplomacy.” If Putin is critical a couple of diplomatic decision, Worth added, he ought to instantly stop the bombing, order a troop withdrawal, and say “unambiguously” that Russia was “ready to de-escalate.”

Within the 4 days since Putin invaded Ukraine, america and European nations have promised a whole bunch of hundreds of thousands of {dollars} in new arms. Germany, for the primary time, will provide 5 hundred Stinger anti-aircraft missiles and a thousand anti-tank weapons. However, with the capital below bombardment from 4 sides, delivering them to Kyiv shall be a problem. And the brand new arms are unlikely to considerably or rapidly change the stability of army energy. The Ukrainian Military stays outmanned and outgunned by Russia. Regardless of the inspiring Ukrainian resistance that has slowed the preliminary incursion, Moscow retains an edge. On Sunday, the U.S. additionally introduced one other fifty-four million {dollars} in humanitarian support for the greater than 100 thousand Ukrainians already displaced by the battle. That brings the entire in U.S. humanitarian support to only over 4 hundred million {dollars} since 2014. For a rustic of forty-four million folks, that help averages lower than ten {dollars} per Ukrainian.

Over the weekend, the G-7—a bunch of the world’s strongest economies that features the U.S., main European powers, Japan, and Canada—additionally introduced 5 sweeping measures to chop Russia off from the worldwide monetary system. These steps will prohibit the Russian central financial institution from utilizing its international reserves—estimated at greater than 600 billion {dollars}—which Putin had constructed as much as cushion injury to the financial system throughout a battle. The measure may even restrict main Russian banks—although not all of them—from utilizing the SWIFT messaging system, by which eleven thousand banks in some 2 hundred international locations and territories make and obtain funds. Primarily based in Belgium, SWIFT has been described because the Gmail of economic transactions. It transmits roughly forty-two million messages a day. The coalition additionally created a brand new worldwide process drive to seek out and freeze the belongings—together with the yachts, jets, fancy automobiles, and luxurious houses—of Russian oligarchs in G-7 international locations.

Russia’s battle chest of international reserves “is simply highly effective if Putin can use it,” a senior Administration official advised reporters on Saturday. “And with out with the ability to purchase the ruble from Western monetary establishments, for instance, Putin’s central financial institution will lose the flexibility to offset the affect of our sanctions.” The ruble, already tumbling, will fall even additional and inflation will spike, he stated, and Russia’s central financial institution shall be “defenseless” to do something about it. The affect can be felt instantly, the official predicted.

In a joint assertion on Saturday, the Western coalition declared Russia’s invasion of Ukraine “an assault on basic worldwide guidelines and norms which have prevailed for the reason that Second World Battle.” Additionally they pledged to “maintain Russia to account and collectively make sure that this battle is a strategic failure for Putin.” The financial steps mirrored an abrupt change in Europe’s willingness to confront Putin. Simply two days earlier, President Biden had stated that European nations had been reluctant to chop off Russia’s entry to SWIFT. The brand new financial squeeze marks a “main achievement,” William Taylor, the previous U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine, now on the U.S. Institute of Peace, advised me. “I’m impressed with the diplomatic effort to get all of them on board.”

But the measures are possible too late to alter the grotesque army actuality on the bottom. On Thursday, the President acknowledged that “nobody anticipated the sanctions to stop something from occurring. That is going to take time.” Putin was not going to say, “Oh, my God, these sanctions are coming. I’m going to face down,” Biden added. The brand new sanctions additionally don’t minimize off all Russian banks from SWIFT. Actually, the announcement was made earlier than the main points had been labored out and the banks recognized. There are “carve-outs,” too, for vitality transactions, designed to attenuate the affect on world vitality markets, notably in Europe, which has been partially depending on Russia for years. The measures are a punishment after the very fact of an invasion, not a deterrent now, Taylor stated. “They won’t make Putin flip round and return to Russia. They’ll punish him over time. They’ll have an accumulative impact.”

Trying again, the central flaw within the West’s technique was the concern that any preëmptive actions—whether or not offering extra high-powered weaponry to Ukraine or imposing financial sanctions on Russia’s energy brokers sooner—can be utilized by Putin as justification to assault Ukraine. The West additionally tried to keep away from enacting financial sanctions that may disrupt the movement of the world’s vitality provides and their very own economies. It’s now clear that the Russian chief meant to invade, regardless of the West did. “He’s gone off the rails,” the previous Protection Secretary and C.I.A. director Robert Gates stated on Sunday, on CNN. Though Putin has all the time been a calculated risktaker throughout his twenty-two years in energy, “this conduct is completely different.” As Western powers mobilize to help Ukraine and confront Putin extra aggressively, there’s an underlying sense of remorse. And the protests all over the world show that there are already questions being requested, with many others sure to comply with, about why way more was not finished upfront to organize Ukraine for battle or to cease Russia’s deranged chief.

Late push falls short as Sun Devils edge past Utes in 63-61 loss


Estimated learn time: 4-5 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY — Two halves inform a full recreation story. And whereas the primary half was a back-and-forth battle, the second half, and arguably an important half, was principally all Arizona State Saturday night time on the Huntsman Heart.

Arizona State capitalized on a five-minute scoring drought by Utah to go on a 9-0 run (11-1 run in totality) halfway via the second half, and the remainder was historical past … or so the Solar Devils thought.

Utah erased a 14-point deficit to tie the sport up 59-all on a Branden Carlson 3-pointer on the prime of the important thing with 1:04 left within the recreation. After a pair of made free throws by Arizona State on the following possession, Carlson discovered Marco Anthony alone below the rim for a dunk to tie it up once more with 28 seconds left in regulation.

Utah utilized a full-court press within the remaining minutes to place strain on the Solar Devils, which turned an efficient technique to restrict Arizona State’s skill to get beauty on the opposite finish. However a blown protection by the Utes on the opposite finish of the ground allowed for Arizona State’s Marreon Jackson to interrupt free for a simple layup to and a 2-point lead with six second remaining.

Craig Smith’s crew elected to let the sport play out as an alternative of taking their remaining timeout and Rollie Worster missed a 15-foot jumper on the baseline because the clock expired to seal a 63-61 victory for the visiting Solar Devils.

“Once you name a timeout, you enable them to arrange their protection; and particularly towards Arizona State the place they’ll — they’re so fast and athletic, I simply thought it will be very tough to get one thing clear that method,” Smith stated.

“Extremely happy with our comeback and the way we dealt with that and gave ourselves an opportunity to win,” he added. “However to win on this league, you’ve got simply bought to be far more sound for 40 minutes, and I did not assume we we did that persistently for the primary half-hour of the sport.”

Utah (11-18, 4-15 Pac-12) made a late push to chop right into a 14-point deficit halfway via the second half and went on a 7-0 run that bought these in attendance believing in a comeback, however Arizona State’s Jay Heath had different plans. The sophomore guard hit a 3-pointer out of a timeout to finish the short-lived run after which hit one other on a following possession to cease any momentum Utah hoped to achieve.

The Washington D.C. native completed the night time with a team-high 20 factors, however his play to neutralize Utah’s momentum was a sufficiently big distinction to sway the sport’s consequence, particularly as Utah struggled to place collectively a constant stretch on offense and protection for the center 20 minutes of the sport.

“In a recreation the place the emphasis is attacking and getting it inside, we definitely did not try this,” Smith stated, talking particularly a few seemingly lackadaisical first half. “We took the straightforward method out and solely shot one free throw and had zero offensive boards, in order that’s an actual dangerous method to have success.”

“I simply do not assume we got here as able to play as we must always have, particularly for this recreation,” Anthony added. ” … We all know that we may play a lot better than that. And I really feel like that confirmed in that final run we type of made. And finally it did not find yourself with the W, but when there’s something optimistic to have a look at from the sport, it is that half.”

Arizona State’s Jalen Graham added 15 factors, 4 rebounds and two assists, and Kimani Lawrence and Luther Muhammad added 10 factors apiece within the win. Muhammad discovered himself on the dropping finish of a lethal transfer by Utah’s Lazar Stefanovic that left the Arizona State participant on the bottom as Stefanovic drained the abruptly open 3-point look.

Anthony began the sport with the recent hand and scored 11 of the crew’s first 20 factors and was a giant contributing issue to Utah conserving it shut with Arizona State within the first half as the remainder of the crew mixed for 21 factors.

The senior guard remained engaged within the second half and was key to Utah’s late run. He completed with a team-high 19 factors and 4 rebounds. He was joined by Carlson’s 15 factors and 6 rebounds as the one two gamers in double figures for the Utes.

“We have been simply type of everywhere in the map with a variety of various things tonight,” Smith stated. “I assumed early within the recreation Marco actually carried us, bought us off to an ideal begin on the offensive finish.

“I assumed we actually settled within the first half for simple photographs, fast photographs — particularly after Marco type of stopped semi-stopped scoring. Simply did not assume we performed in assault mode on both finish of the ground, fairly frankly.”

The Utes have every week off earlier than the common season finale on the Huntsman Heart on Saturday, March 5 (7:30 p.m. MST, ESPNU) towards the visiting Colorado Buffaloes, who upset No. 2 Arizona Saturday night time. Arizona was one of many six prime groups ranked within the Related Press High 25 to drop a recreation Saturday.

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Arizona State edges past Utah as late push falls short


Utah Utes guard Rollie Worster (25) and Utah Utes heart Branden Carlson (35) battle Arizona State Solar Devils ahead Kimani Lawrence (4) for the rebound as Utah and Arizona State play an NCAA basketball recreation within the Huntsman Heart on the College of Utah in Salt Lake Metropolis on Saturday, Feb. 26, 2022. (Scott G Winterton, Deseret Information)

Estimated learn time: 2-3 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY — Two halves inform a full recreation story. And whereas the primary half was a back-and-forth battle, the second half, and arguably an important half, was largely all Arizona State Saturday night time on the Huntsman Heart.

Arizona State capitalized on a five-minute scoring drought by Utah to go on a 9-0 run (11-1 run in totality) halfway via the second half, and the remaining was historical past … or so the Solar Devils thought.

Utah erased a 14-point deficit to tie the sport up 59-all on a Branden Carlson 3-pointer on the prime of the important thing with 1:04 left within the recreation. After a pair of made free throws by Arizona State on the following possession, Carlson discovered Marco Anthony alone underneath the rim for a dunk to tie it up once more,

However Arizona State’s Marreon Jackson acquired to the rim on the opposite finish for a straightforward layup. Craig Smith staff elected to let the sport play out as a substitute of taking a timeout and Rollie Worster missed a 15-foot jumper on the baseline because the clock expired to seas a 63-61 victory for the visiting Solar Devils.

Utah (11-18, 4-15 Pac-12) made a late push to chop right into a 14-point deficit halfway via the second half and went on a 7-0 run that acquired these in attendance believing in a comeback, however Arizona State’s Jay Heath had different plans. The sophomore guard hit a 3-pointer out of a timeout to finish the short-lived run after which hit one other on a following possession to cease any momentum Utah hoped to realize.

The Washington D.C. native completed the night time with a team-high 20 factors, however his play to neutralize Utah’s momentum was a large enough distinction to sway the sport’s outcome. Arizona State’s Jalen Graham added 15 factors, 4 rebounds and two assists, and Kimani Lawrence and Luther Muhammad added 10 factors apiece within the win.

Muhammad discovered himself on the shedding finish of a lethal transfer by Utah’s Lazar Stefanovic that left Muhammad on the bottom as Stefanovic drained the out of the blue open 3-point look.

Anthony began the sport with the recent hand and scored 11 of the staff’s first 20 factors. The senior guard remained sizzling during the sport and completed with a team-high 19 factors and 4 rebounds. Carlson added 51 factors and 6 rebounds within the loss.

This story shall be up to date.

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Is It Too Late for Obama On Immigration Reform? | Immigration Battle | FRONTLINE | PBS


President Barack Obama’s pledge to overtake the nation’s immigration insurance policies now hinges on how briskly, if in any respect, the Supreme Courtroom considers the primary authorized problem to these reforms.

On Monday, a federal appeals courtroom dominated that the administration couldn’t transfer ahead with a plan to present as many as 5 million undocumented immigrants with work permits and safety from deportation.

The result shocked nobody. Nonetheless, proponents of the reforms have been hoping the choice would arrive in time for the administration to petition the Supreme Courtroom to determine the case as early as this spring. If the appeals courtroom’s ruling is overturned, that might enable the reforms to be applied earlier than the president leaves workplace in Jan. 2017. In any other case, the insurance policies face an unsure future within the arms of the subsequent president.

Reform supporters say they’re optimistic, however authorized consultants say that the timeline might now be too tight for the Supreme Courtroom to rule on the case throughout its present time period — until the justices take the bizarre step of expediting its evaluation.

The administration has been battling courtroom challenges — and the clock — because the president introduced the coverage, referred to as Deferred Motion for Mother and father of People (DAPA), in addition to a separate plan to develop protections for immigrants delivered to america as kids. Obama unveiled the initiatives after complete immigration reform died on Capitol Hill final yr, saying  he would not look ahead to Congress to finish its impasse over reform.

The two govt actions have been instantly challenged by the lawyer basic of Texas in a lawsuit that was joined by 25 different states who mentioned they’d be financially harmed by the initiatives. The states argued that the administration overstepped its authority with the initiatives, wading into policy-making territory usually reserved for Congress.

In February, a federal decide in Texas dominated that the administration should halt the reforms. In Could, a three-member panel of america Courtroom of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit upheld that injunction in a preliminary determination. On Monday, its last ruling got here out — a 2-1 determination towards the Obama administration.

Regardless of the defeat, advocates for reform “breathed an enormous sigh of aid” when it got here down, mentioned Melissa Crow, authorized director for the American Immigration Council, which filed an amicus transient in favor of the administration’s actions. Supporters had been anticipating the choice towards their case for months — the one query was whether or not it might arrive in time for an enchantment to be made to the Supreme Courtroom this yr.

“We knew we needed to have the Fifth Circuit determination earlier than we might transfer ahead. The beginning gun has now been fired and we’re not in limbo, which is nice,” Crow mentioned.

After the choice got here out Monday, the Division of Justice introduced that it might enchantment the case “as shortly as doable.” Crow mentioned the division has been making ready the enchantment for months, and that it might come inside days.

The 26 states concerned within the go well with will then have 30 days to answer the enchantment — however they’ll additionally search an extension of one other 30 days, mentioned Josh Blackman, a regulation professor at South Texas School of Legislation, who filed an amicus transient supporting the states. The Justice Division is certain to oppose the extension, however Blackman mentioned its probabilities of profitable that combat are slim: “I can’t discover any occasion the place the courtroom denied a 30-day extension. Typically talking, they’re automated.”

As soon as the states submit their response, the Supreme Courtroom often offers itself about two weeks to evaluation a case, after which the justices convene to determine whether or not to listen to it, mentioned Blackman.

In previous years, circumstances thought of by the courtroom earlier than Jan. 15 are usually heard throughout its present time period, which ends in June; circumstances that come later are heard within the subsequent time period, which begins in October — too late for the Obama administration to finish the months-long work of implementing the coverage.

Blackman did the maths: If the Justice Division appeals by Nov. 20, the states would have at the least till Dec. 20 to file a short. If they’re granted the conventional 30-day extension, that takes them to the top of January. That may push the enchantment previous the essential mid-January inflection level.

Even then, although, the Supreme Courtroom might nonetheless select to listen to the case this time period, if the justices take into account it pressing sufficient. However they will not be motivated to rush the query, in keeping with Blackman.

At concern is a “very critical separation of powers concern,” he famous, one that might require the courtroom to rule on how far a president’s energy for govt motion can go — an space of regulation that he mentioned has been gray for many years. The courtroom has thought of such points earlier than, Blackman mentioned, however its basic coverage has tended towards making larger selections than it strictly has to.

“I don’t suppose they’ll be rushed to resolve such a critical concern,” mentioned Blackman, particularly since “this case might go away completely with the subsequent presidential election if a Republican turns into president.”

However Crow famous that the courtroom wouldn’t essentially should resolve the chief motion query. As an alternative, it might decide that Texas lacks standing to problem the case.

Texas has argued that it has standing as a result of it must spend extra to concern driver’s licenses and supply different state companies to undocumented immigrants protected by the president’s proposals. However the federal authorities has argued that the state is more likely to profit from elevated tax income.

In its ruling this week, the bulk for the Fifth Circuit mentioned Texas had standing, noting that the state would lose a minimal of $130.89 for every driver’s license issued to a DAPA beneficiary.

In her 53-page dissent, Decide Carolyn King questioned that argument, and took concern with the pace at which the courtroom’s ruling was issued.

“I’ve a agency and particular conviction {that a} mistake has been made,” wrote King. “That mistake has been exacerbated by the prolonged delay that has occurred in deciding this ‘expedited’ enchantment. There isn’t a justification for that delay.”


Katie Worth

Katie Price, Former Reporter, FRONTLINE



Russia, Soccer and a Line Drawn Too Late


Everton, for instance, whose stadium and coaching facility are sponsored by USM, the holding firm based by a Russian billionaire and now working below sanctions from the USA’ Treasury Division; or Chelsea, bankrolled by an oligarch named by a British lawmaker as a doable goal for sanctions earlier this week; or Manchester United, studiously quiet on its sponsorship cope with Aeroflot, the state-backed Russian airline, until suddenly dropping it Friday.

Nonetheless, what do you count on, when the very our bodies who’re presupposed to characterize the sport have been so acquiescent? UEFA has, at the very least, stripped St. Petersburg of this yr’s Champions League last, one thing it has discovered simpler than annulling its personal, profitable sponsorship settlement with Gazprom.

After which, in fact, there may be FIFA. Oh, FIFA, whose president as soon as accepted a friendship medal from Putin and claimed that the 2018 World Cup had highlighted how incorrect the Western notion of the ruthless kleptocracy he presided over had been. On Thursday, that president, Gianni Infantino, did condemn Russia’s “use of pressure in Ukraine,” although there have been instances when outright criticism did not seem to come easily.

Even inserting these groups, these our bodies below scrutiny, although, should still be a contact unfair. The concept that any of those establishments must be anticipated to have a cogent, thought of response to a significant, unfolding international disaster is, at coronary heart, faintly absurd.

The problems which have pushed the world up to now, their underlying causes, their long-term ramifications, are means past not solely the scope of their experience — let’s go dwell, now, to Frank Lampard, for his tackle the Minsk accords of 2014 — however the limits of their world.