HBCUs got a windfall of COVID relief money. Here’s how colleges are spending it : NPR

When laptop science main Elijah Love obtained the invoice for his summer time courses, he discovered the credit had been free. His college, North Carolina A&T State College, used federal COVID aid funding to pay for them.

Liz Schlemmer/WUNC


disguise caption

toggle caption

Liz Schlemmer/WUNC


When laptop science main Elijah Love obtained the invoice for his summer time courses, he discovered the credit had been free. His college, North Carolina A&T State College, used federal COVID aid funding to pay for them.

Liz Schlemmer/WUNC

After a few tough semesters through the pandemic, Elijah Love, a pc science main at North Carolina A&T State College (N.C. A&T), was decided to graduate on time.

“No matter got here with that — summer time courses, double-load programs — I used to be keen to do it,” Love says.

This summer time, that meant persevering with to take courses on high of educating laptop science to center college women and enrolling in a summer time studying program at IBM.

He was ready to pay for the additional summer time credit, however then he obtained the invoice: The courses had been free. His college, a traditionally Black college, had used federal COVID aid funding to pay for the summer time programs.

“I obtained proper again on monitor,” Love says. “I assumed it was nice. It was a terrific alternative for the folks struggling proper now.”

HBCUs have lengthy been underfunded by federal and state governments. However this time, due to the way in which federal COVID aid cash was allotted, these colleges obtained a lot of it. For one factor, a lot of the funding focused colleges that serve extra low-income college students, which HBCUs do. And there was an entire different pot of cash — $5.2 billion — only for HBCUs.

“By far, it is essentially the most sum of money we have ever obtained,” says Kenny Spayd, the enterprise director of Fayetteville State College, a small public HBCU additionally in North Carolina.

Spayd says the practically $80 million his college obtained is the same as greater than half of Fayetteville State’s annual working funds.

“So it has been extremely useful and transformative, not just for us, however for our college students as we navigate this persevering with pandemic.”

The federal cash did include guidelines on the way it might be spent, however some colleges obtained greater than sufficient to cowl these necessities, pay for COVID security precautions and nonetheless have loads left over.

The cash additionally got here with a deadline: It must be spent by the tip of this college 12 months, June 2023.

HBCUs across the nation informed NPR they’re utilizing the funds in methods that may have an effect on college students for years to return, together with canceling pupil debt, upgrading campus infrastructure and serving to retain college students who battle due to monetary obstacles.

Paying for college kids’ housing, meals and textbooks

N.C. A&T is the nation’s largest HBCU, and it obtained one of many largest federal aid packages of all HBCUs: $188.6 million, greater than the college’s present endowment.

It wasn’t the one HBCU to supply free summer time programs — the truth is, all 5 public HBCUs within the UNC system paid for his or her college students’ summer time courses this 12 months utilizing federal aid funds.

N.C. A&T additionally used the funds to grant housing and eating reductions to residential college students, and provides free iPads to freshmen and free textbooks to all college students.

Robert Pompey is vice chancellor for enterprise and finance at N.C. A&T, the nation’s largest HBCU. The varsity obtained one of many largest federal aid packages of all HBCUs.

Liz Schlemmer/WUNC


disguise caption

toggle caption

Liz Schlemmer/WUNC


Robert Pompey is vice chancellor for enterprise and finance at N.C. A&T, the nation’s largest HBCU. The varsity obtained one of many largest federal aid packages of all HBCUs.

Liz Schlemmer/WUNC

Robert Pompey, N.C. A&T’s vice chancellor for enterprise and finance, says these assist packages are serving to college students begin out the varsity 12 months on the suitable foot.

“Think about going to the primary day of sophistication, and also you not solely have textbooks, however you could have the iPad with you. Think about going to your first day of sophistication and your value of eating and housing has been diminished by $500. That’s vital,” Pompey says.

In keeping with the varsity, some college students have obtained greater than $4,000 value of advantages a 12 months.

By decreasing the general value of attendance, Pompey says, the college helps college students get better each academically and financially.

“When you could have the scholars which might be from essentially the most difficult financial circumstances, they’re those who’re essentially the most impacted.”

HBCUs weren’t the one colleges to focus on college students who had been struggling financially through the pandemic. In truth, the CARES Act required all colleges to place a portion of their assist cash immediately into the pockets of scholars who confronted monetary stress resulting from COVID.

Giving college students a clear monetary slate to allow them to enroll in courses once more

One other well-liked HBCU spending merchandise was canceling college students’ excellent balances for tuition, charges, room and board, and different miscellaneous costs they owed their universities. That is as a result of when a pupil’s steadiness will get too excessive, they cannot enroll in courses once more till it is cleared.

At Florida A&M College, college students cannot enroll if their steadiness is above $500. The varsity spent a giant chunk of its aid cash — greater than $60 million of its $195 million aid bundle — on giving these college students a clear slate.

“These college students, you realize, hundreds of them, had been in a position to stick with us,” says Florida A&M College President Larry Robinson. “And that is going to repay large time.”

Fayetteville State, N.C. A&T and Morgan State College in Baltimore additionally canceled some stage of pupil debt to assist present college students reenroll. Robinson says, consequently, Florida A&M has already seen a major enhance in its freshman to sophomore 12 months retention charge.

Updating campus buildings and expertise

A number of HBCUs stated they used the cash to replace expertise and constructing infrastructure.

Morgan State College spent about $10 million to improve its expertise and pivot shortly to on-line studying. The college outfitted greater than 200 school rooms with cameras so college students may get a greater view of their courses remotely.

“And since we’ve invested on this expertise, we’re increasing our on-line supply of diploma packages,” says Sidney Evans, Morgan State’s govt vp for finance.

He says that may assist develop the college sooner or later.

Morgan State additionally spent greater than $25 million to deal with mould and mildew injury in buildings that had been closed for months early within the pandemic. And Fayetteville State is utilizing federal assist to improve the HVAC programs in a few of its residence halls for higher air high quality.

Development initiatives like these have been well-liked avenues for aid spending. Whereas many of the federal assist cash expires in summer time 2023, the federal authorities is permitting some colleges, together with HBCUs, to complete authorised development initiatives past that expiration date.

After the aid cash runs out, the work continues

Finally, the federal funding will run out, or hit the spending deadline. Fayetteville State & N.C. A&T are already in search of methods to proceed a few of these initiatives on a smaller scale, resembling giving reductions on summer time college and textbooks. Each colleges say they see it as an funding that may assist uplift college students, households and their communities.

“We get up desirous about, on daily basis, what can we do to make a distinction within the lives of our college students?” says Pompey of N.C. A&T. “We take into account these funds that we have obtained investments, and we have invested in our college students.”

South Korea to scrap COVID tests for arrivals in boost for travel | Aviation

Travellers to the nation will now not be required to current a unfavorable coronavirus check consequence beginning on Saturday.

South Korea will scrap predeparture COVID-19 checks for arrivals, eradicating the final of its pandemic-related border controls in a lift to the nation’s beleaguered journey business.

Travellers to the nation will now not be required to current a unfavorable coronavirus check consequence beginning on Saturday, the Yonhap information company reported on Wednesday.

The change comes after a authorities advisory committee really helpful ending the obligatory PCR checks for inbound travellers.

South Korea is among the many area’s final economies to carry onto strict border controls, although China, which has an ultra-strict “zero COVID” technique, Japan and Taiwan proceed to impose in depth limitations to journey.

Asian international locations together with Thailand, the Philippines, Malaysia and Indonesia have lifted testing necessities in current months because the area welcomes again journey after relying closely on border restrictions earlier within the pandemic.

South Korea lifted quarantine necessities for vaccinated vacationers in April and dropped quarantine for all arrivals no matter vaccination standing in July. Vacationers have been gradual to return, nonetheless, with passenger visitors at important gateway Incheon Airport in July reaching lower than one-quarter of pre-pandemic ranges.

The East Asian nation has reported among the highest numbers of COVID-19 circumstances on the planet in current weeks regardless of excessive vaccination charges and widespread mask-wearing, though the overwhelming majority of infections have been gentle.

Every day circumstances have hovered at about 100,000 since topping 180,000 in mid-August amid the unfold of extremely transmissible Omicron sub-variants.

What you should know about the CDC’s new COVID guidelines for schools : NPR

Third grade college students take part at school at Highland Elementary Faculty in Las Cruces, N.M., within the spring.

Paul Ratje/AFP by way of Getty Photographs


conceal caption

toggle caption

Paul Ratje/AFP by way of Getty Photographs


Third grade college students take part at school at Highland Elementary Faculty in Las Cruces, N.M., within the spring.

Paul Ratje/AFP by way of Getty Photographs

The brand new college yr is underway and so are new federal tips to curb the unfold of COVID-19.

The Facilities for Illness Management and Prevention launched up to date suggestions on Thursday, largely loosening virus protocols and leaving a lot of the decision-making to people and native officers.

The adjustments to the present steering are a mirrored image of the nation’s sweeping immunity. Round 95% of the inhabitants have some immunity as a consequence of a mix of vaccination and previous infections, in accordance with Greta Massetti, a senior epidemiologist on the CDC.

“We even have a greater understanding of shield folks from being uncovered to the virus,” Massetti mentioned in a press release. “This steering acknowledges that the pandemic shouldn’t be over, but additionally helps us transfer to some extent the place COVID-19 not severely disrupts our day by day lives.”

Well being measures will most likely look completely different relying on the varsity district, however listed here are some issues to learn about finest practices advisable by the CDC.

Common indoor masking is advisable in practically half the nation

The CDC calls on college students and workers members to put on “well-fitting” masks in school in the event that they dwell in communities the place COVID-19 transmission charges are excessive. As of Thursday, that accounts for practically 40% of counties within the U.S., together with Los Angeles, Nashville and most of Florida.

Normally, college students who’re sick from or uncovered to the virus ought to put on face coverings for 10 days, no matter whether or not they have been vaccinated or beforehand contaminated. The newest steering additionally advise folks to placed on a masks whereas within the college nurse’s workplace or different well being care settings.

The CDC requested college directors to make sure that masking polices accommodate college students with disabilities or those that are immunocompromised.

“College students with immunocompromising situations or different situations or disabilities that enhance danger for getting very sick with COVID-19 shouldn’t be positioned into separate lecture rooms or in any other case segregated from different college students,” the company mentioned.

Routine testing is not advisable, with some exceptions

The company not recommends routine testing in Ok-12 faculties until COVID-19 transmission charges are excessive within the space.

If that is the case, college directors ought to take into account implementing well being screens for “high-risk actions” like close-contact sports activities, band and theater. Massive occasions like promenade, tournaments and discipline journeys also needs to incorporate testing or presumably be rescheduled if an infection charges turn out to be regarding. The identical guidelines apply for the primary day again after the vacations and different trip breaks, in accordance with the CDC.

In the case of testing, the brand new tips additionally make no distinction between vaccinated or unvaccinated folks — which is a pointy distinction from earlier guidelines.

Quarantine necessities are dropped

Just like routine testing, the CDC is not advising college students or workers members who’re uncovered to the virus to quarantine. As a substitute, the company’s new recommendation is that individuals who had been uncovered put on face coverings for 10 days and get examined.

Due to the testing and quarantine coverage adjustments, the CDC says that “test-to-stay” applications, which required uncovered unvaccinated college students to get examined often with a purpose to attend college, are not obligatory.

That being mentioned, the company urges faculties to permit for “versatile, non-punitive and supportive” paid sick go away insurance policies in addition to permit for excused absences when college students are sick.

“Keep away from insurance policies that incentivize coming to highschool whereas sick, and assist youngsters who’re studying at house if they’re sick,” the brand new tips say.

What to do should you or your pupil is sick

College students and workers members who expertise signs like a cough, fever or sore throat ought to head house and get examined instantly, the CDC mentioned. For people who find themselves liable to getting severely in poor health from COVID-19, the company recommends consulting their physician.

Those that check optimistic ought to isolate at house for not less than 5 days. Afterward, isolation will depend on whether or not they proceed to exhibit signs or check optimistic for the virus.

College students and workers members sick with the virus do not should get a unfavorable check end result to finish isolation, nevertheless it might shorten the variety of days they need to put on a masks after getting sick.

However typically, the CDC recommends college students and workers proceed carrying a masks for 10 days after signs started to point out.

Tearful reunions as Western Australia ends COVID border closure | Coronavirus pandemic News


Australia’s largest state ends one of many world’s longest coronavirus-related border closures.

Australia’s largest state has reopened to completely vaccinated home and worldwide travellers, ending one of many world’s longest coronavirus border closures.

Western Australia, which covers one-third of the nation’s land space, closed its borders to most worldwide and interstate travellers in 2020 to gradual the unfold of COVID-19.

However these restrictions have been lifted on Thursday, after 697 days, changing into the final Australian state to raise border curbs.

The transfer got here greater than every week after the Australian federal authorities started granting visas to vaccinated vacationers and 4 months after Australia’s greatest metropolis, Sydney, started its staged reopening of quarantine-free journey.

The airport in Perth, Western Australia’s capital, was the scene of emotional reunions as the primary of twenty-two scheduled home flights and 5 worldwide flights started arriving on Thursday.

“We count on about 5,000 home and worldwide travellers to reach on Thursday and tens of hundreds of individuals within the coming weeks,” mentioned Al Jazeera’s Sarah Clarke, reporting from Brisbane on Australia’s east coast.

“There have been emotional scenes on the airport. We’ve seen so many individuals arrive and reunite. It’s actually the tip of a really uncommon chapter the place we had one state minimize off from the remainder of the nation for such an extended time frame.”

With a purpose to enter Western Australia, travellers will have to be absolutely vaccinated and full a journey move.

They may even should bear a speedy check inside 12 hours of arrival and report any constructive end result to authorities, although the measure might be reviewed after two weeks.

Unvaccinated returning Australians will nonetheless be required to undergo lodge quarantine.

Western Australia had efficiently stopped the native unfold of the coronavirus all through the pandemic, by contact tracing and isolating carriers, till the extremely contagious Omicron variant arrived this 12 months.

The state now stories greater than 1,000 new infections daily.

“Australia is now lastly again collectively,” Qantas Airways Chief Govt Alan Joyce mentioned. “Today has been a very long time coming.”

On Wednesday, 61 deaths from COVID-19 have been reported throughout Australia. None was reported that day in Western Australia, Tasmania or the Australian Capital Territory.

COVID stimulus spending failed to deliver on climate promises


Take heed to the most recent science information, with Benjamin Thompson and Nick Petrić Howe.

On this episode:

00:47 G20 nations fail to chop emissions in COVID stimulus packages

The G20 economies spent $14 trillion {dollars} on restoration packages to flee the worldwide recession pushed by the COVID-19 pandemic. Many governments made pledges to ship emissions reductions as a part of these packages. This week, a workforce of researchers have analysed the spending to see if these guarantees had been stored.

Remark: G20’s US$14-trillion financial stimulus reneges on emissions pledges

09:34 Analysis Highlights

A man-made nerve cell triggers a Venus flytrap’s snap, and a fossil exhibits that pterosaurs within the Jurassic interval had been bigger than beforehand thought.

Analysis Spotlight: Venus flytrap snaps shut at artificial neuron’s command

Analysis Spotlight: The surprisingly large reptile that prowled the Jurassic skies

12:10 How realizing a little bit about somebody modifications how nameless you are feeling

This week, a workforce of researchers have used lab-based research to point out how studying a little bit a few stranger makes an individual really feel that the stranger is aware of one thing about them. The workforce took this work out of the lab and into New York Metropolis, the place they confirmed that offering residents with information about neighborhood cops quickly lowered crime.

Analysis article: Shah & LaForest

Information and Views: Letters and playing cards telling individuals about native police scale back crime

23:18 The experiences of Ukrainian researchers following the Russian invasion

Following Russia’s unprovoked invasion of Ukraine on 24 February, we hear in regards to the experiences of Ukranian researchers because the battle continues, and the outpouring of condemnation from the broader educational world.

Information: World analysis neighborhood condemns Russian invasion of Ukraine

Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable every day round-up of science information, opinion and evaluation free in your inbox each weekday.

By no means miss an episode: Subscribe to the Nature Podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify or your favorite podcast app. Head right here for the Nature Podcast RSS feed.

Utah health officials report 19 COVID deaths as US Navy arrives to support hospital staff


Dr. Kencee Graves talks with members of the U.S. Navy as they arrive to help the College of Utah Hospital in Salt Lake Metropolis on Wednesday. (Kristin Murphy, Deseret Information)

Estimated learn time: 4-5 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah well being officers reported 19 COVID-19 deaths on Wednesday, together with 461 new instances.

The rolling, seven-day common for brand new optimistic checks is now 405 per day. The seven-day common for optimistic checks is at the moment 13.2%, persevering with a decline, in line with the Utah Division of Well being.

It additionally reported Wednesday that one other 3,882 folks in Utah have been examined and a couple of,434 have been vaccinated. And, faculty kids accounted for 45 of the 461 new instances. Of these, 25 instances have been kids between ages 5 and 10, 5 have been ages 11-13, and 15 have been ages 14-17.

At the moment, 306 persons are hospitalized within the state with COVID-19, in line with the well being division, with 63 of these sufferers in intensive care. A number of weeks in the past, in mid-January, there have been greater than 600 folks hospitalized with COVID-19, together with a whole bunch within the ICU.

ICU capability is now at 71%, and ICU referral facilities are 73% full — each beneath the warning ranges.

On the peak of the omicron variant’s affect on the state’s hospitals, there have been 853 COVID-19 patents hospitalized. Now the state is on the lowest COVID-19 hospitalization ranges that it has seen since July 22, shortly after the delta variant grew to become prevalent in Utah.

U.S. Navy helps with surgical procedure backlog

A medical group of 20 United States Navy officers despatched by the nation’s Division of Protection arrived on the College of Utah Hospital on Wednesday to begin a 30-day deployment to help with a backlog of surgical procedures.

Surgical procedures have been placed on maintain whereas the omicron variant took lots of the hospital’s assets. Having further medically skilled folks will imply the hospital can open extra beds and reschedule surgical procedures which were placed on maintain.

This deployment is a part of the Division of Protection’s efforts to help the whole-of-government response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and is in collaboration with state leaders, in line with a U. Well being press launch.

“Whereas we’re seeing declining numbers in COVID instances, 52 beds stay out of service due to staffing shortages,” Dr. Michael Good, CEO at College of Utah Well being, mentioned.

He mentioned the hospital deferred a whole bunch of surgical procedures and was compelled into “onerous choices” relating to whether or not to take switch sufferers through the wave of omicron variant COVID-19 infections.

“Due to FEMA and with the assistance of colleagues from the Division of Protection, which is able to give attention to treating COVID-positive sufferers, we will start to handle these challenges and supply wanted care to all sufferers in Utah and all through the Mountain West,” Good mentioned.

The medical group of physicians, respiratory therapists, directors and primarily nurses will give attention to direct affected person care wants.

The press launch defined that the U. Hospital is commonly the very best or solely choice for essentially the most complicated sufferers within the space, and that help from the federal authorities will enable for these sufferers to be served extra shortly.

“We’re grateful for this help … and the continuing collaboration with our state leaders to assist restore our operations.” Good mentioned.

Just lately reported COVID-19 deaths

In Wednesday’s report, well being officers introduced 19 new deaths, bringing the state’s COVID-19 loss of life toll to 4,436 all through the pandemic.

Of people that died with COVID-19, 43.4% had a pre-existing situation, 81.3% have been thought-about excessive danger as a result of they have been over 65 or had a pre-existing situation, and 59.6% have been hospitalized after they died. Males have accounted for simply over 60% of the COVID-19 deaths in Utah.

The deaths reported Wednesday symbolize 10 totally different counties all through the state. Solely one of many people was youthful than 65, and 11 have been older than 85.

The most recent COVID-19 deaths in Utah embody:

  • A Tooele County lady between 65 and 84, it’s unknown whether or not she was hospitalized or at a long-term care facility.
  • A Salt Lake County lady, over 85, long-term care facility resident.
  • A Davis County lady, over 85, unknown if hospitalized or in a long-term care facility.
  • A Juab County lady, over 85, unknown if hospitalized or in a long-term care facility.
  • A Weber County lady, 65-84, unknown if hospitalized or in a long-term care facility.
  • A Utah County man, over 85, not hospitalized.
  • A Utah County lady, over 85, not hospitalized.
  • A Sevier County man, over 85, unknown if hospitalized or in a long-term care facility.
  • A Salt Lake County man, 65-84, hospitalized.
  • A Cache County man, 65-84, unknown if hospitalized or in a long-term care facility.
  • A Washington County man, over 85, not hospitalized.
  • A Uintah County man, over 85, not hospitalized.
  • A Salt Lake County man, over 85, not hospitalized.
  • Two Salt Lake County males, 65-84, each not hospitalized.
  • A Washington County man, 65-84, not hospitalized.
  • A Utah County man, over 85, hospitalized.
  • A Salt Lake County man, over 85, unknown if hospitalized or in a long-term care facility.
  • A Uintah County lady, 45-64, hospitalized.

Pictures

Extra tales you could be desirous about

Utah health officials report 19 COVID deaths as Navy sends aid to hospitals to support staff


Dr. Kencee Graves talks with members of the U.S. Navy as they arrive to assist the College of Utah Hospital in Salt Lake Metropolis on Wednesday. The Utah Division of Well being reported 461 instances and 19 deaths within the newest day by day COVID-19 report. (Kristin Murphy, Deseret Information)

Estimated learn time: 2-3 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah well being officers reported 19 COVID-19 deaths on Wednesday, together with 461 new instances.

The rolling seven-day common for brand spanking new optimistic assessments is now 405 per day. The seven-day common for optimistic assessments is at present 13.2%, persevering with a decline.

The well being division reported one other 3,882 individuals who had been examined and a couple of,434 who had been vaccinated.

Faculty kids account for 45 of the 461 new instances. Of these instances, 25 had been kids between ages 5 and 10, 5 had been kids 11-13, and 15 had been kids 14-17.

At present, 306 individuals are hospitalized within the state with COVID-19, in accordance with the Utah Division of Well being.

U.S. Navy helps with surgical procedure backlog

A medical group of 20 United States Navy officers despatched by the Division of Protection arrived on the College of Utah Hospital on Wednesday to begin a 30-day deployment to assist with a backlog of surgical procedures.

These surgical procedures had been placed on maintain whereas the omicron variant took lots of the hospital’s assets. Having extra educated medical individuals will imply the hospital can open extra beds and reschedule surgical procedures that had been placed on maintain.

This deployment is a part of the Division of Protection’s efforts to assist the whole-of-government response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and is in collaboration with state leaders, in accordance with a U of U press launch.

“Whereas we’re seeing declining numbers in COVID instances, 52 beds stay out of service due to staffing shortages,” mentioned Dr. Michael Good, CEO of College of Utah Well being.

He mentioned the hospital deferred tons of of surgical procedures and was compelled into laborious selections concerning whether or not to take switch sufferers in the course of the omicron COVID-19 wave.

“Due to FEMA and with the assistance of colleagues from the Division of Protection, which is able to concentrate on treating COVID-positive sufferers, we will start to handle these challenges and supply wanted care to all sufferers in Utah and all through the Mountain West,” Good mentioned.

This story can be up to date.

Images

Extra tales you could be focused on

Utah health officials report 19 COVID deaths as Navy sends support to hospitals to support staff


Dr. Kencee Graves talks with members of the U.S. Navy as they arrive to assist the College of Utah Hospital in Salt Lake Metropolis on Wednesday. The Utah Division of Well being reported 461 instances and 19 deaths within the newest day by day COVID-19 report. (Kristin Murphy, Deseret Information)

Estimated learn time: 2-3 minutes

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah well being officers reported 19 COVID-19 deaths on Wednesday, together with 461 new instances.

The rolling seven-day common for brand new constructive exams is now 405 per day. The seven-day common for constructive exams is at the moment 13.2%, persevering with a decline.

The well being division reported one other 3,882 individuals who have been examined and a pair of,434 who have been vaccinated.

Faculty kids account for 45 of the 461 new instances. Of these instances, 25 have been kids between ages 5 and 10, 5 have been kids 11-13, and 15 have been kids 14-17.

Presently, 306 individuals are hospitalized within the state with COVID-19, in keeping with the Utah Division of Well being.

U.S. Navy helps with surgical procedure backlog

A medical group of 20 United States Navy officers despatched by the Division of Protection arrived on the College of Utah Hospital on Wednesday to begin a 30-day deployment to assist with a backlog of surgical procedures.

These surgical procedures have been placed on maintain whereas the omicron variant took most of the hospital’s sources. Having further skilled medical folks will imply the hospital can open extra beds and reschedule surgical procedures that have been placed on maintain.

This deployment is a part of the Division of Protection’s efforts to assist the whole-of-government response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and is in collaboration with state leaders, in keeping with a U of U press launch.

“Whereas we’re seeing declining numbers in COVID instances, 52 beds stay out of service due to staffing shortages,” mentioned Dr. Michael Good, CEO of College of Utah Well being.

He mentioned the hospital deferred lots of of surgical procedures and was pressured into laborious selections relating to whether or not to take switch sufferers in the course of the omicron COVID-19 wave.

“Because of FEMA and with the assistance of colleagues from the Division of Protection, which can concentrate on treating COVID-positive sufferers, we are able to start to handle these challenges and supply wanted care to all sufferers in Utah and all through the Mountain West,” Good mentioned.

This story will likely be up to date.

Photographs

Extra tales you could be fascinated by