Man kills 3 children, 1 other and himself at California church : NPR


Legislation enforcement autos from a number of businesses block a road close to the scene of a capturing in Sacramento, Calif., on Monday.

Wealthy Pedroncelli/AP


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Wealthy Pedroncelli/AP


Legislation enforcement autos from a number of businesses block a road close to the scene of a capturing in Sacramento, Calif., on Monday.

Wealthy Pedroncelli/AP

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — A person shot and killed his three youngsters, their chaperone and himself throughout a supervised go to with the youngsters Monday at a church in Sacramento, California, authorities stated.

Deputies responding to stories of gunfire round 5 p.m. discovered 5 individuals lifeless, together with the shooter, on the church within the Arden-Arcade neighborhood, stated Sgt. Rod Grassmann with the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Workplace.

The victims included three juveniles underneath 15 years previous, Grassmann stated. He did not know their genders.

The shooter was estranged from the kids’s mom, who had a restraining order in opposition to him, Sheriff Scott Jones stated.

Investigators imagine the capturing occurred throughout a supervised go to with the kids and the fourth sufferer was their chaperone, Jones stated.

The shooter’s id wasn’t instantly launched.

A church worker heard the gunshots and known as 911, Grassmann stated. The capturing occurred in the principle sanctuary space, he stated.

Sheriff’s officers are investigating it as a home violence incident, Grassmann stated.

Officers did not know if the members of the family belonged to the the church, which sits on a largely residential block close to a industrial space east of downtown Sacramento.

It wasn’t instantly recognized how many individuals had been on the church or if there have been any providers or actions on the time of the capturing.

Gov. Gavin Newsom stated his workplace was working with native legislation enforcement.

“One other mindless act of gun violence in America — this time in our yard. In a church with youngsters inside. Completely devastating,” Newsom stated on Twitter.

Man kills 3 children, 1 other, himself at California church


Regulation enforcement autos from a number of businesses block a road close to the scene of a taking pictures in Sacramento, Calif., Monday. A person shot and killed his three youngsters, their chaperone and himself throughout a supervised go to with the youngsters Monday at a church in Sacramento, California, authorities mentioned. (Wealthy Pedroncelli, Related Press)

Estimated learn time: 1-2 minutes

SACRAMENTO, Calif. — A person shot and killed his three youngsters, their chaperone and himself throughout a supervised go to with the youngsters Monday at a church in Sacramento, California, authorities mentioned.

Deputies responding to studies of gunfire round 5 p.m. Pacific Time discovered 5 individuals useless, together with the shooter, on the church within the Arden-Arcade neighborhood, mentioned Sgt. Rod Grassmann with the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Workplace.

The victims included three juveniles beneath 15 years outdated, Grassman mentioned. He did not know their genders.

The shooter was estranged from the kids’s mom, who had a restraining order in opposition to him, Sheriff Scott Jones mentioned.

Investigators consider the taking pictures occurred throughout a supervised go to with the kids and the fourth sufferer was their chaperone, Jones mentioned.

The shooter’s id wasn’t instantly launched.

A church worker heard the gunshots and known as 911, Grassman mentioned. The taking pictures occurred in the primary sanctuary space, he mentioned.

Sheriff’s officers are investigating it as a home violence incident, Grassman mentioned.

Officers did not know if the members of the family belonged to the the church, which sits on a principally residential block close to a industrial space east of downtown Sacramento.

It wasn’t instantly recognized how many individuals had been on the church or if there have been any companies or actions on the time of the taking pictures.

Gov. Gavin Newsom mentioned his workplace was working with native regulation enforcement.

“One other mindless act of gun violence in America — this time in our yard. In a church with children inside. Completely devastating,” Newsom mentioned on Twitter.

Contributing: Stefanie Dazio

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Kathleen Ronayne and Christopher Weber

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Climate crisis: Will small California farms survive soaring heat? | Climate Crisis News


Los Angeles, California, US – Final summer season was the most popular that Kayode Kadara can bear in mind for the reason that late Seventies, when he started visiting the San Joaquin Valley, the huge farming area between the Sierra Nevadas and the California coast.

The co-owner of TAC Farm, a small farm in Allensworth, stated temperatures soared to at the least 40 levels Celsius for a number of days. He may work outdoors just for a short while earlier than dashing again into his air-conditioned home.

The San Joaquin Valley – probably the most worthwhile agricultural area in america, with eight million acres of farmland and 200,000 employees who present meals to individuals within the US, Europe, Canada, China and different international locations – faces a attainable rise in annual common most temperatures of two.7 levels Celsius by mid-century, and as much as 4.4 levels Celsius by the top of the century, in keeping with a brand new state-commissioned local weather report launched in January.

From 1950 to 2020, the valley’s temperature has elevated by 0.6 levels Celsius, the report famous. It discovered the local weather disaster has already created water shortage and over-reliance on groundwater, hitting small-scale farmers particularly arduous, together with many Hmong, Latinx and African American farmers.

Droughts and earlier snowmelt runoff will improve water shortage in the course of the summer season, particularly in areas with irrigated agriculture, resulting in financial losses and elevated stress on groundwater, a brand new report (PDF) launched on Monday from the Worldwide Panel on Local weather Change additionally predicted.

Kadara runs TAC Farm together with his enterprise companion and brother-in-law Dennis Hutson. The 2 dreamed of making a sustainable farm as an financial engine in Allensworth, a once-thriving African American neighborhood based in 1908 by an escaped slave and military colonel. Via regenerative practices, they remodeled a depleted piece of sandy land right into a nutrient-rich plot that produces wheat, oats, kale, alfalfa, watermelons and cantaloupes.

Dry fieldTAC Farm use regenerative farming practices so as to add vitamins to the soil [Courtesy of Kayode Kadara and Dennis Hutson]

However the farm’s lifeblood is a 720-foot effectively that pumps water to the crops, and so they should compete for water in opposition to close by agricultural giants with the sources to drill down a lot deeper. 9 years in the past, their effectively ran dry. In close by Porterville, a whole lot of wells have dried up lately.

“The research to me are true. The forecast is principally what we’re seeing proper now,” Kadara instructed Al Jazeera. “Because it will get hotter, I don’t know what the heck we are going to do.”

Longer dry seasons

Hutson and Kadara are an odd pair: Hutson is an optimistic minister who preaches at two close by church buildings, whereas Kadara is a pragmatist centered on innovation and science. In Allensworth, a low-income neighborhood of largely farmworkers, Hutson envisioned the farm as a solution to generate income so the county would “not view us as a neighborhood at all times with its hand out”. The farm is giving individuals “a way of pleasure of their neighborhood”, he instructed Al Jazeera.

Kadara is happy with the farm’s sustainable practises; the wind used to blow chemical-filled mud from close by farms onto the land, however they planted bushes and shrubs as windbreaks. They use compost, resist tilling and develop cowl crops to enhance soil well being, and so they plan to put in owl bins to ask the pure predators to feast on gophers that chew on the water strains.

One of many fundamental sources of water for the San Joaquin Valley is the snowpack within the Sierra Nevadas, which melts in spring and fills reservoirs. However because the area heats up, the quantity of snow is lowering, and it’s melting earlier within the yr. The wet season is projected to develop shorter, with longer dry seasons in the summertime, that means floor water will probably be much less out there to farmers once they want it, forcing them to more and more depend on groundwater.

Hutson and Kadara have water on their farm – for now. However they might should drill deeper in future, at a value of a whole lot of 1000’s of {dollars} they don’t have.

“We will discuss all of the methods to handle local weather change – cease utilizing fossil fuels, swap to electrical energy and stuff like that – however what’s going to it do now that the impacts are right here?” Kadara stated. “That’s the priority and the scary half for me. It’s right here.”

Bottle with black waterIn some communities within the San Joaquin Valley, the faucet water runs black as a consequence of excessive ranges of manganese [Courtesy of Jose Pablo Ortiz-Partida]

Weak communities

In response to the local weather report, greater than 4.3 million individuals reside within the San Joaquin Valley, and greater than half are in deprived communities.

The report’s lead authors, Jose Pablo Ortiz-Partida and Angel Santiago Fernandez-Bou, instructed Al Jazeera that small-scale farms are most in danger from local weather change as a result of their shallow wells are the primary to dry up when groundwater is depleted. They’ve few sources to adapt and fewer political illustration than massive farms, and language boundaries can even make issues tougher for Hmong and Latinx farmers.

More and more, farm employees are affected by warmth stroke, each within the subject and at house, as many can’t afford air-con, Ortiz-Partida added.

“Folks consider local weather change as one thing of the longer term, however we see its results right here in California, however particularly the San Joaquin Valley, daily,” Fernandez-Bou stated.

Lots of of 1000’s of individuals on this area should not have dependable entry to scrub consuming water. As groundwater is depleted by local weather change and over-extraction, the degrees of sediments and pollution within the effectively water improve. Within the metropolis of San Joaquin, in Fresno County, the faucet water has run black as a consequence of excessive ranges of manganese. Different communities have harmful quantities of arsenic, pathogens resembling E. coli, and cancer-causing chemical substances resembling chromium VI.

Local weather change is exacerbating all these points, whereas the shortage of funding in essential infrastructure, together with water and sewage programs, make these communities “among the most weak to local weather change in america”, the report famous.

Tractor on fieldTAC Farm has obtained small authorities grants to improve its pump and irrigation pipe, and to construct up vitamins within the soil [Courtesy of Kayode Kadara and Dennis Hutson]

Regulating groundwater

In response to Fernandez-Bou and Ortiz-Partida, small farmers who use regenerative practises are well-positioned to deal with the local weather disaster as a result of their land can sequester carbon, and improve soil well being and water retention. As well as, small farms are likely to reinvest of their communities, main to higher socioeconomic outcomes on a broader scale. Kadara and Hutson additionally partnered with UC Berkeley to make use of an progressive methodology of eradicating arsenic from their effectively water.

“Regenerative agriculture is solely the follow of working in concord with nature versus working in opposition to it,” Hutson defined.

Kadara and Hutson know that valley residents will face stress to maneuver within the coming a long time, however they personally haven’t any plans to go away.

TAC Farm has obtained small authorities grants to improve its pump and irrigation pipe, and to construct up vitamins within the soil. The farmers additionally hope a brand new regulation will improve water fairness; California has lengthy regulated floor water, however solely not too long ago handed the Sustainable Groundwater Administration Act, which requires areas to develop plans to control groundwater alongside set timelines. However the brand new regulation is in its early levels, and a few districts might not have the ability to totally implement sustainability plans by 2040, the report famous.

“As a substitute of complaining, I consider you may seize the alternatives and make good issues occur,” Hutson stated.

“You see, it doesn’t take a lot to get me to begin preaching,” he joked. “I select to assume positively.”

Authorities seize almost $3M worth of meth disguised as onions in California


This photograph reveals the Otay Mesa business facility the place authorities found virtually 1,200 small packages of methamphetamine hidden inside a cargo of onions on Feb. 13. (U.S. Customs and Border Safety through AP)

Estimated learn time: 2-3 minutes

OTAY MESA, Calif. — U.S. Customs and Border Safety officers have seized practically $3 million value of methamphetamine hidden in small packages inside a cargo of onions at a business facility in San Diego, the company mentioned.

Federal officers on the Otay Mesa port-of-entry facility final Sunday encountered a 46-year-old man who was driving a tractor trailer containing a big cargo “manifested as onions,” Customs and Border Safety introduced in a information launch Friday.

Throughout an preliminary inspection of the automobile, one officer directed the driving force and cargo to a extra intensive examination performed by the company’s Ok-9 group, the discharge mentioned.

One of many detector canine alerted officers to the cargo, who found 1,197 packages of meth — roughly 1,336 kilos — value an estimated road worth of $2.9 million, based on Customs and Border Safety.

The packages, which had been combined with the onion cargo in sacks, “had been formed into small globes with a white overlaying, designed to mix into the onions they had been hidden with,” the discharge mentioned.

Officers arrested the driving force, an unidentified Mexico citizen, for the alleged narcotic smuggling try and turned him over to the custody of US Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Homeland Safety Investigations for “additional disposition,” based on Customs and Border Safety. Additionally they seized the tractor, trailer and narcotics, the company mentioned.

“This was not solely a intelligent try and try to smuggle in narcotics, one I have never seen earlier than, but additionally time-consuming to wrap narcotics into these small packages, designed to appear like onions,” mentioned Sidney Aki, Customs and Border Safety director of area operations in San Diego.

“These efforts present how efficient our officers are, and as a response, the lengths drug trafficking organizations are keen to go to as they attempt to smuggle narcotics into the U.S.,” the assertion continued. “Whereas we now have actually seen narcotics in produce earlier than, it is uncommon for us to see this degree of element within the concealment.”

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A physician at University of California, San Francisco reflects on equity in STEM | NOVA



Physique + MindPhysique & Mind

Dr. Katherine Julian, the granddaughter of famed chemist Percy Julian, discusses her grandfather’s legacy—and the way obstacles for folks of coloration in science nonetheless exist.

Katherine Julian, doctor and affiliate dean of graduate medical training on the College of California, San Francisco (UCSF). Picture courtesy of UCSF

The grandson of Alabama slaves, Percy Julian labored tirelessly—transitioning from college school rooms to non-public laboratories; from the U.S. to Austria and again—to discover a place that might permit him to work in chemistry. After one yr as a division head at Howard College—a stint that resulted in his resignation—Julian would go on to work at DePauw College, the place he grew to become the primary to ever completely synthesize physostigmine, an alkaloid used to deal with glaucoma.

His different successes, which embody synthesizing cortisone (used to deal with arthritis) and progesterone (used to forestall miscarriages) improved society. Additionally they helped pave the best way for Black, Indigenous, and different folks of coloration in STEM, and encourage the subsequent technology of scientists.

A type of scientists is Percy Julian’s granddaughter, Katherine Julian. A doctor and affiliate dean of graduate medical training on the College of California, San Francisco, Katherine trains medical residents and fellows, and researches medical training. Her work of practising science and educating others mirrors—and honors—her grandfather’s legacy, and she or he sees Percy Julian’s sacrifices mirrored within the work she and different Black scientists do in the present day. 

Plenty of Black folks “must work thrice as laborious” to be taken significantly, Katherine says. “I feel that form of work ethic is one thing that I’ve to proceed to uphold—actually in my skilled world. That has been instilled in me in a long-lasting method.” 

Katherine spoke with NOVA about her recollections of Percy, her profession, and the impact his life and work has had on the best way she perceives progress in STEM in the present day.

Hanna Ali: Black scientists and hobbyists nonetheless face discrimination within the lab and in public, very similar to Percy Julian did himself. As a rule, the onus is on Black, Indigenous, and different folks of coloration to push their manner into STEM environments and educate their friends on what it means to deal with them with humanity.

Do you usually discover that your cohort of scholars is pretty various, and have you ever seen extra strides being made at UCSF to make extra alternatives for college students of coloration?

Katherine Julian: In my nearly 25-year profession—and I feel this isn’t simply at UCSF, that is on a bigger scale—we’ve made nice strides to grow to be extra various in science. Do I feel we’re the place we should be? No, after all not. And I nonetheless really feel like we have now a methods to go. 

We aren’t good. Now we have many issues to be taught and alter. However I do really feel like we’re at a singular level—notably now—as a result of, sadly, of many present occasions. There’s extra consciousness-raising presently than I’ve seen within the final 20 years. I really feel like that’s an unbelievable alternative to have the ability to proceed to make change.

HA: Within the time that your lives overlapped, did you witness your grandfather working as a chemist? In that case, what impression did this go away on you?

KJ: Effectively, he handed away once I was fairly younger. The facet that I noticed of him was not essentially the scientist facet. I noticed a facet that was tremendous enthusiastic about gardening: the backyard he had, round his home [in Chicago] and on the grounds of his dwelling. He beloved tulips—and planted hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of tulip bulbs within the floor. [He’d] exit and backyard each morning earlier than going to work. 

I feel it does replicate that he was somebody who labored so extremely laborious. I feel he was somebody that put himself absolutely into many, many issues. Clearly he had science. And shifting that ahead and to do the issues that he did, I feel required such unbelievable fortitude.

HA: Did your grandfather use gardening as a method to educate the youthful youngsters in your loved ones?

KJ: I positively bear in mind being on the market with him. I used to be most likely too younger for there to be any type of training facet. However I do suppose after he handed away, there was an training facet: from my grandmother and my father and my aunt, when it comes to his legacy and what that meant, and nearly a accountability for that legacy. And that goes slightly bit towards having to work twice as laborious and the way necessary training is. I feel that there was very a lot a sense that he had labored so laborious to have the ability to advance Black and African People and to have the ability to present for his household. 

HA: It looks like, as an alternative of a hands-on instructing strategy, there was extra of a legacy of studying.

KJ: That’s precisely proper. 

HA: “Forgotten Genius” presents a perspective of Percy Julian’s profession and in addition means that he made a number of pals alongside the best way, together with some abroad in Austria, that got here to do analysis with him within the States in a while. Are you in contact with any of them?

KJ: You understand, I really am in contact with a household pal—she’s now of superior age. Her household labored with my grandfather. She now lives in Israel. 

She travels to the U.S. every year—effectively, not in COVID occasions—often for competitions. She’s a scientist herself, and we get collectively yearly when she comes. So there may be a few of that connection, clearly, as a result of my grandfather now can be very previous, and plenty of these connections have now handed. Staying in contact together with her [has] actually been terrific. And [being] capable of hear previous tales has been nice. 

HA: It’s attention-grabbing to consider how Percy Julian needed to go in another country simply to get extra analysis and work expertise. 

KJ: And to come across all the racism and obstacles there—simply even to attempt to dwell in the neighborhood of what he was attempting to dwell—I feel required unbelievable fortitude. 

HA: My members of the family are immigrants, and we don’t have that type of lengthy story of a household legacy in America. It’s extra like, “Your dad and mom got here right here to go to high school they usually made a life for themselves. Any type of household historical past is again in Somalia.” 

KJ: I see an immigrant’s story in a manner similar to the best way you suppose again to fortitude. How laborious it’s to go away all the pieces behind, to go someplace new to attempt to make a greater life—whether or not it is for you or usually actually on your children—proper? So I see it as very, very related. I can not communicate for kids of immigrants, however having spoken to a number of of my pals, I do suppose additionally they really feel a giant accountability. It is like, “Wow, my dad and mom went via all of this for me…I’ve a accountability to pay that ahead in a manner.” 

HA: We’ve been highlighting “Black in X” weeks at NOVA, speaking about what it means to be a Black scientist. Being a doctor, do you end up having to clarify probably the most fundamental inequities in well being care or STEM to your friends, the place you say one thing like, “I shouldn’t must let you know this, however I do?”

KJ: You understand, not a lot now. A few of that could be a operate of the stage I am at in my profession, [and] the place I am at, being at UCSF, the place I do suppose individuals are actually well being fairness in an actual manner and considering deeply about it. I do really feel lucky that I’m not having these conversations in my office, a minimum of presently. I’ve, years and years in the past, [but] I do really feel that that is a marker the place I’m when it comes to change. As a result of I additionally acknowledge that is not the case for a lot of, many different folks and the place they’re. 

The present pandemic has simply uncovered a lot well being inequity. And I feel folks—a minimum of the parents I’m working with—understand that. I do suppose people are actually wanting and excited about “How can we, as a medical neighborhood, make a distinction when it comes to actually attempting to remove these disparities and assist?” 

This interview has been edited for size and readability.